THE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY IN THE NURSING PROFESSION: A NEW NURSING INFORMATICS TASK FORCE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164822
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY IN THE NURSING PROFESSION: A NEW NURSING INFORMATICS TASK FORCE
Author(s):
Tam, Corinna Kin-Yan; Law, Ethel; Rodriguez, German
Author Details:
Corinna Kin-Yan Tam, RN, BSN, Registered Nurse, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: tamk@mskcc.org; Ethel Law, RN, MA, OCN; German Rodriguez, RN, MSN
Abstract:
Education: Information systems present enormous opportunities for improving the delivery, documentation, and evaluation of patient care. However, the challenges for nurses in integrating increasing amounts of data and using new technology can be significant. If nurses are not adequately educated on how to take full advantage of the potential benefits of these systems, patient care can be significantly compromised. While all nurses at this NCI designated comprehensive cancer center received baseline training in managing patient information through our Clinical Information Systems (CIS), retention of skills and acquisition of ongoing upgrade information is problematic given the complexity of our systems and the nurses' clinical workload. This presentation will describe an educational strategy developed by a Nursing Informatics Task Force comprised of ambulatory care nurses representing different treatment specialties with information technology experience from beginner to advance. The goals were to foster confidence, improve mastery and sustain an ongoing skill level in the use of CIS by ambulatory care nurses. The task force first conducted a needs assessment of all ambulatory care nurses which resulted in a 60% (n=239) response rate. Seventeen learning needs were identified; the top five were selected for our initial three-phased education program. In phase one, the task force members were educated to develop CIS expertise. In phase two, member experts educated staff at the clinical unit level, leading monthly educational programs and training volunteer super users. In phase three, the task force members published "tips of the month" in our ambulatory newsletter, wrote topic-specific handouts for staff, and explored other creative strategies to sustain staff skills. Specific competencies were defined and evaluated by return demonstration based on clinical case studies. Staff feedback to task force members and super users and direct observation of CIS use in clinical practice were other methods used for evaluation. At the completion of the education, ambulatory care nurses will be re-surveyed about efficacy of the program. Oncology nurses must learn of ways to continuously improve and support practice. As emerging technology becomes more complex and enables us to be more efficient and deliver safe quality care, nurses must possess basic nursing informatics competencies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY IN THE NURSING PROFESSION: A NEW NURSING INFORMATICS TASK FORCEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTam, Corinna Kin-Yanen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaw, Ethelen_US
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Germanen_US
dc.author.detailsCorinna Kin-Yan Tam, RN, BSN, Registered Nurse, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: tamk@mskcc.org; Ethel Law, RN, MA, OCN; German Rodriguez, RN, MSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164822-
dc.description.abstractEducation: Information systems present enormous opportunities for improving the delivery, documentation, and evaluation of patient care. However, the challenges for nurses in integrating increasing amounts of data and using new technology can be significant. If nurses are not adequately educated on how to take full advantage of the potential benefits of these systems, patient care can be significantly compromised. While all nurses at this NCI designated comprehensive cancer center received baseline training in managing patient information through our Clinical Information Systems (CIS), retention of skills and acquisition of ongoing upgrade information is problematic given the complexity of our systems and the nurses' clinical workload. This presentation will describe an educational strategy developed by a Nursing Informatics Task Force comprised of ambulatory care nurses representing different treatment specialties with information technology experience from beginner to advance. The goals were to foster confidence, improve mastery and sustain an ongoing skill level in the use of CIS by ambulatory care nurses. The task force first conducted a needs assessment of all ambulatory care nurses which resulted in a 60% (n=239) response rate. Seventeen learning needs were identified; the top five were selected for our initial three-phased education program. In phase one, the task force members were educated to develop CIS expertise. In phase two, member experts educated staff at the clinical unit level, leading monthly educational programs and training volunteer super users. In phase three, the task force members published "tips of the month" in our ambulatory newsletter, wrote topic-specific handouts for staff, and explored other creative strategies to sustain staff skills. Specific competencies were defined and evaluated by return demonstration based on clinical case studies. Staff feedback to task force members and super users and direct observation of CIS use in clinical practice were other methods used for evaluation. At the completion of the education, ambulatory care nurses will be re-surveyed about efficacy of the program. Oncology nurses must learn of ways to continuously improve and support practice. As emerging technology becomes more complex and enables us to be more efficient and deliver safe quality care, nurses must possess basic nursing informatics competencies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:38Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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