2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164825
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cancer Symptom Attribution in American Indian Populations
Author(s):
Tesar, Emily; Blaseg, Karyl
Author Details:
Emily Tesar, RN, MSN, OCN, Regional Care Navigator, Billings Clinic, Billings, Montana, USA, email: etesar@billingsclinic.org; Karyl Blaseg, RN, MSN, OCN, BC
Abstract:
Research Study: American Indians (AI) in Montana are diagnosed at later stages of cancer than Caucasian Montana residents; fewer AI are diagnosed at stage I and II disease, and more at time of stage III and IV cancers. AI face many external barriers that certainly contribute to these findings: lack of insurance, difficulty with maneuvering Indian Health Services (IHS), lack of funding for IHS to conduct appropriate and timely screenings; cost of transportation, housing, and child care. However, there has been little research into AI symptom attribution (internal barriers), and a literature review did not find any research examining this phenomena. The purpose of this pilot study is gain an understanding of how American Indians (AI) attribute cancer symptoms, and how current education targeting AI regarding cancer screening and early detection should be modified.. The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) states "oncology nurses strive to provide comprehensive cancer prevention education and early-detection services in a manner consistent with the cultural background and healthcare beliefs of individuals and families." Grounded theory is the qualitative approach that emphasizes the importance of the context within which people function via a phenomenon known as symbolic interactionism. Symbolic interactionism views the individual as being active rather than passive, by planning, projecting, and creating actions based upon interpretations of each other's behaviors. AI from the Crow, Fort Peck, and Northern Cheyenne Reservations undergoing cancer treatment at Billings Clinic will be asked several open-ended questions about early cancer symptoms and personal attribution of those symptoms. Interviews will be recorded and transcribed. Interview transcripts will be the source for data analysis. This study will be initiating January 2009. However, the major practice implications of this pilot study are to provide culturally relevant cancer screening and early detection education to AI. Additionally, a substantive grounded theory will emerge accounting for the experience of cancer among AI. What this theory will be cannot be predicted, nor can the possible nursing implications. The likelihood is great for emergent hypotheses that could be verified by quantitative studies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCancer Symptom Attribution in American Indian Populationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTesar, Emilyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlaseg, Karylen_US
dc.author.detailsEmily Tesar, RN, MSN, OCN, Regional Care Navigator, Billings Clinic, Billings, Montana, USA, email: etesar@billingsclinic.org; Karyl Blaseg, RN, MSN, OCN, BCen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164825-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: American Indians (AI) in Montana are diagnosed at later stages of cancer than Caucasian Montana residents; fewer AI are diagnosed at stage I and II disease, and more at time of stage III and IV cancers. AI face many external barriers that certainly contribute to these findings: lack of insurance, difficulty with maneuvering Indian Health Services (IHS), lack of funding for IHS to conduct appropriate and timely screenings; cost of transportation, housing, and child care. However, there has been little research into AI symptom attribution (internal barriers), and a literature review did not find any research examining this phenomena. The purpose of this pilot study is gain an understanding of how American Indians (AI) attribute cancer symptoms, and how current education targeting AI regarding cancer screening and early detection should be modified.. The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) states "oncology nurses strive to provide comprehensive cancer prevention education and early-detection services in a manner consistent with the cultural background and healthcare beliefs of individuals and families." Grounded theory is the qualitative approach that emphasizes the importance of the context within which people function via a phenomenon known as symbolic interactionism. Symbolic interactionism views the individual as being active rather than passive, by planning, projecting, and creating actions based upon interpretations of each other's behaviors. AI from the Crow, Fort Peck, and Northern Cheyenne Reservations undergoing cancer treatment at Billings Clinic will be asked several open-ended questions about early cancer symptoms and personal attribution of those symptoms. Interviews will be recorded and transcribed. Interview transcripts will be the source for data analysis. This study will be initiating January 2009. However, the major practice implications of this pilot study are to provide culturally relevant cancer screening and early detection education to AI. Additionally, a substantive grounded theory will emerge accounting for the experience of cancer among AI. What this theory will be cannot be predicted, nor can the possible nursing implications. The likelihood is great for emergent hypotheses that could be verified by quantitative studies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:41Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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