SITE SPECIFIC NURSE NAVIGATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED ONCOLOGY/HEMATOLOGY PATIENTS

5.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164826
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SITE SPECIFIC NURSE NAVIGATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED ONCOLOGY/HEMATOLOGY PATIENTS
Author(s):
Tesar, Emily
Author Details:
Emily Tesar, RN, MSN, OCN, Regional Care Navigator, Billings Clinic, Billings, Montana, USA, email: edettro@yahoo.com
Abstract:
Education: Receiving a new cancer diagnosis is overwhelming for even the most healthcare savvy patient. A new diagnosis comes with additional diagnostic examinations, multiple scheduling requirements (infusion, radiation, diagnostics, supportive care), concerns about financial burdens during treatment, and profound psychosocial needs. Due to this being an overwhelming time, crucial appointments can be missed and patients may not tap into all resources that comprehensive cancer programs offer. At the Billings Clinic Cancer Center, seven cancer-site specific oncology nurses are on staff to attend appointments with patients and act as their professional safety nets. Nurse navigators attend appointments with all newly diagnosed patients, offer education and support, and ensure they receive comprehensive, multidisciplinary care. Seven oncology nurses are assigned to be navigators for patients with the following cancer diagnosis: breast, GI (colon, rectal, pancreatic, esophageal, stomach), GU (bladder, kidney, prostate, testicular), GYN (vaginal, ovarian, vulvar, cervical, endometrial), hematological (multiple myeloma, lymphoma, leukemia), lung, melanoma, unknown primary, CNS, sarcoma, and head and neck. Patients have a navigator to act as a guide and attend all appointments until patients are on their second cycle of treatment, or are able to maneuver the oncology medical system independently. In 2007, a survey conducted on 148 navigated patients revealed the following: 91% felt they understood the role of navigation, 92% felt their navigator played an important role, and 92% of patients felt their care was well coordinated. Patients who treat at the Billings Clinic are assigned a nurse navigator who provides education, support, and ensures patients receive optimal multidisciplinary care. Navigators play an important role on the healthcare team for a newly diagnosed cancer patient.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSITE SPECIFIC NURSE NAVIGATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED ONCOLOGY/HEMATOLOGY PATIENTSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTesar, Emilyen_US
dc.author.detailsEmily Tesar, RN, MSN, OCN, Regional Care Navigator, Billings Clinic, Billings, Montana, USA, email: edettro@yahoo.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164826-
dc.description.abstractEducation: Receiving a new cancer diagnosis is overwhelming for even the most healthcare savvy patient. A new diagnosis comes with additional diagnostic examinations, multiple scheduling requirements (infusion, radiation, diagnostics, supportive care), concerns about financial burdens during treatment, and profound psychosocial needs. Due to this being an overwhelming time, crucial appointments can be missed and patients may not tap into all resources that comprehensive cancer programs offer. At the Billings Clinic Cancer Center, seven cancer-site specific oncology nurses are on staff to attend appointments with patients and act as their professional safety nets. Nurse navigators attend appointments with all newly diagnosed patients, offer education and support, and ensure they receive comprehensive, multidisciplinary care. Seven oncology nurses are assigned to be navigators for patients with the following cancer diagnosis: breast, GI (colon, rectal, pancreatic, esophageal, stomach), GU (bladder, kidney, prostate, testicular), GYN (vaginal, ovarian, vulvar, cervical, endometrial), hematological (multiple myeloma, lymphoma, leukemia), lung, melanoma, unknown primary, CNS, sarcoma, and head and neck. Patients have a navigator to act as a guide and attend all appointments until patients are on their second cycle of treatment, or are able to maneuver the oncology medical system independently. In 2007, a survey conducted on 148 navigated patients revealed the following: 91% felt they understood the role of navigation, 92% felt their navigator played an important role, and 92% of patients felt their care was well coordinated. Patients who treat at the Billings Clinic are assigned a nurse navigator who provides education, support, and ensures patients receive optimal multidisciplinary care. Navigators play an important role on the healthcare team for a newly diagnosed cancer patient.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:42Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.