2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164828
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Peripheral Neuropathy in Colon Cancer Patients Receiving Oxaliplatin
Author(s):
Tofthagen, Cindy; McMillan, Susan
Author Details:
Cindy Tofthagen, PhD, ARNP, AOCNP, Assistant professor, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: ctofthag@health.usf.edu; Susan McMillan, PhD, ARNP, FAAN
Abstract:
Research Study: Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in the United States. Colon cancer related deaths have steadily decreased over the last twenty years largely because of early detection but also because of the development of new treatment options like oxaliplatin. Unfortunately, neuropathic side effects are commonly reported in patients receiving oxaliplatin. The incidence of paresthesias as a result of exposure to cold temperatures has been well documented. Data on the occurrence of other neuropathic symptoms, symptom severity, symptom distress, or interference with usual activities are not available. The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore the prevalence of neuropathic symptoms in colon cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin as well as to explore symptom severity, symptom distress and neuropathic interference with usual activities among colon cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin. Peripheral neuropathy and symptom management have been identified by ONS as top research priorities for 2005-2009. The Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms suggests that the number of symptoms a patient experiences, symptom severity and symptom distress all contribute to the patientÆs physical and emotional functioning. Thirty-three outpatients receiving oxaliplatin at Moffitt Cancer Center completed the Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Assessment Tool (CIPNAT), a self-report tool that evaluates neuropathic symptoms, severity, intensity, and interference with activities. Patients were included in the study if they had received at least one cycle of oxaliplatin, were between 18-90 years of age, had no history of diabetes, and spoke English. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Participants experienced an average of 4.6 neuropathic symptoms. Mean severity of symptoms was 4.8 on a scale of 0-10 and mean symptom distress was 4.0. Cold sensitivity was the most frequently reported neuropathic symptom followed by tingling hands, numb hands, tingling feet, muscle weakness, numb feet, arthralgias/myalgias, loss of balance and neuropathic pain. Patients reported that neuropathic symptoms interfered with numerous activities including sleep, work, enjoyment of life. Patients who receive oxaliplatin experience both sensory and motor neuropathies that are moderately severe and distressing and interfere with physical and emotional well-being. Oncology nurses can use this information to help educate patients about potential side effects of oxaliplatin.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePeripheral Neuropathy in Colon Cancer Patients Receiving Oxaliplatinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTofthagen, Cindyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsCindy Tofthagen, PhD, ARNP, AOCNP, Assistant professor, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: ctofthag@health.usf.edu; Susan McMillan, PhD, ARNP, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164828-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in the United States. Colon cancer related deaths have steadily decreased over the last twenty years largely because of early detection but also because of the development of new treatment options like oxaliplatin. Unfortunately, neuropathic side effects are commonly reported in patients receiving oxaliplatin. The incidence of paresthesias as a result of exposure to cold temperatures has been well documented. Data on the occurrence of other neuropathic symptoms, symptom severity, symptom distress, or interference with usual activities are not available. The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore the prevalence of neuropathic symptoms in colon cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin as well as to explore symptom severity, symptom distress and neuropathic interference with usual activities among colon cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin. Peripheral neuropathy and symptom management have been identified by ONS as top research priorities for 2005-2009. The Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms suggests that the number of symptoms a patient experiences, symptom severity and symptom distress all contribute to the patientÆs physical and emotional functioning. Thirty-three outpatients receiving oxaliplatin at Moffitt Cancer Center completed the Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Assessment Tool (CIPNAT), a self-report tool that evaluates neuropathic symptoms, severity, intensity, and interference with activities. Patients were included in the study if they had received at least one cycle of oxaliplatin, were between 18-90 years of age, had no history of diabetes, and spoke English. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Participants experienced an average of 4.6 neuropathic symptoms. Mean severity of symptoms was 4.8 on a scale of 0-10 and mean symptom distress was 4.0. Cold sensitivity was the most frequently reported neuropathic symptom followed by tingling hands, numb hands, tingling feet, muscle weakness, numb feet, arthralgias/myalgias, loss of balance and neuropathic pain. Patients reported that neuropathic symptoms interfered with numerous activities including sleep, work, enjoyment of life. Patients who receive oxaliplatin experience both sensory and motor neuropathies that are moderately severe and distressing and interfere with physical and emotional well-being. Oncology nurses can use this information to help educate patients about potential side effects of oxaliplatin.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:45Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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