FACTORS INFLUENCING CANCER SURVIVORS INFORMATION SEEKING BEHAVIORS: A REVIEW OF RESOURCE UTILIZATION AMONG ONCOLOGY PATIENTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164829
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
FACTORS INFLUENCING CANCER SURVIVORS INFORMATION SEEKING BEHAVIORS: A REVIEW OF RESOURCE UTILIZATION AMONG ONCOLOGY PATIENTS
Author(s):
Tolbert, Vicki
Author Details:
Vicki Tolbert, RN, BSN, OCN, CCRP, Cancer Research Nurse Coordinator, Thomas Johns Cancer Hospital at CJW Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: vicki.tolbert@hcahealthcare.com
Abstract:
Education: Studies indicate that most cancer patients want to be informed. In this age of information technology, understanding the phenomenon of information seeking among cancer survivors is more important than ever to ensure that patients are educated on the management of their disease in a manner in which they prefer and are exposed to credible resources. The purpose of this project was to determine what factors influence cancer information seeking behavior, what types of information were important and what resources survivors found to be most helpful. During a two week period, patients with a cancer diagnosis evaluated in an outpatient oncology office were given the opportunity to participate in this study. A questionnaire consisting of Likert-type questions was developed that addressed cancer information seeking behavior, resources and useful types of information. The questionnaire was nurse developed and completed by the survivor without family input. Sixty patients were enrolled on the study which represented an 87% response rate. Equal importance was given to learning about their cancer diagnosis, their treatment and side effects. Although 82% reported receiving information from their healthcare professionals, two-thirds (70%) of all participants reported seeking more knowledge about their cancer. Significant predictors included age less than sixty, female gender and patients within their first year of diagnosis. Healthcare professionals were ranked first as the preferred resource. Most striking was patients did not cite the internet as one of their top sources. Some reported the internet to be confusing and too vast to explore. Survivors preferred books/ medical journals second and media generated health information third. Family and friends were recognized for information as well as support. The study reaffirmed that patients continue to believe that their healthcare practitioners are their best source for health information. Although the internet is assumed to be the top choice for medical information, not all populations are using this tool as evidenced by the study. It is important to determine information seeking behaviors of patients including methods of learning and resources they prefer to ensure patients receive optimal learning and referral to credible resources.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFACTORS INFLUENCING CANCER SURVIVORS INFORMATION SEEKING BEHAVIORS: A REVIEW OF RESOURCE UTILIZATION AMONG ONCOLOGY PATIENTSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTolbert, Vickien_US
dc.author.detailsVicki Tolbert, RN, BSN, OCN, CCRP, Cancer Research Nurse Coordinator, Thomas Johns Cancer Hospital at CJW Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: vicki.tolbert@hcahealthcare.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164829-
dc.description.abstractEducation: Studies indicate that most cancer patients want to be informed. In this age of information technology, understanding the phenomenon of information seeking among cancer survivors is more important than ever to ensure that patients are educated on the management of their disease in a manner in which they prefer and are exposed to credible resources. The purpose of this project was to determine what factors influence cancer information seeking behavior, what types of information were important and what resources survivors found to be most helpful. During a two week period, patients with a cancer diagnosis evaluated in an outpatient oncology office were given the opportunity to participate in this study. A questionnaire consisting of Likert-type questions was developed that addressed cancer information seeking behavior, resources and useful types of information. The questionnaire was nurse developed and completed by the survivor without family input. Sixty patients were enrolled on the study which represented an 87% response rate. Equal importance was given to learning about their cancer diagnosis, their treatment and side effects. Although 82% reported receiving information from their healthcare professionals, two-thirds (70%) of all participants reported seeking more knowledge about their cancer. Significant predictors included age less than sixty, female gender and patients within their first year of diagnosis. Healthcare professionals were ranked first as the preferred resource. Most striking was patients did not cite the internet as one of their top sources. Some reported the internet to be confusing and too vast to explore. Survivors preferred books/ medical journals second and media generated health information third. Family and friends were recognized for information as well as support. The study reaffirmed that patients continue to believe that their healthcare practitioners are their best source for health information. Although the internet is assumed to be the top choice for medical information, not all populations are using this tool as evidenced by the study. It is important to determine information seeking behaviors of patients including methods of learning and resources they prefer to ensure patients receive optimal learning and referral to credible resources.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:46Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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