Infusion Reactions Associated with Monoclonal Antibodies: Issues for Oncology Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164834
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Infusion Reactions Associated with Monoclonal Antibodies: Issues for Oncology Nurses
Author(s):
Viale, Pamela
Author Details:
Pamela Viale, RN, MS CS, ANP, AOCNP, Oncology Nurse Practitioner, Oncology Nurse Consultant and Nurse Practitioner, Saratoga, California, USA, email: p.viale@comcast.net
Abstract:
Education: Monoclonal antibodies are an important part of the armamentarium of therapeutics used to treat patients with cancer. Although the overall incidence of hypersensitivity reactions associated with chemotherapy treatments is approximately 5%, the incidence of infusion reactions with some monoclonal antibodies can be much higher. Infusion reactions can occur within minutes of drug administration or as a delayed response. Additionally, certain geographic areas have been linked to higher infusion reactions rates with specific antibodies. Oncology nurses attending the Oncology Nursing Society's Annual Meeting in 2005 were surveyed about their perceptions regarding infusion reactions showing that these common reactions can be emotionally difficult for nurses and patients. Schwartzberg et al conducted a retrospective chart review of severe infusion reactions and also noted that these events are challenging for patients and staff, with potential for increased hospitalization costs. The purpose of this presentation is to describe monoclonal antibodies at risk for infusion reaction, and strategies to manage this common, yet sometimes fatal adverse event. Obtaining a comprehensive allergy history and knowledge of specific patient groups at risk, including awareness of the potential for geographic differences in the allergic response rate for specific medications are all important strategies in the identification of patients at risk. Clinical pathways, algorithms, and directives would benefit clinicians in preparing a planned approach to infusion reactions. Achieving competency in the management of infusion reactions is essential. Performing mock training for staff on responding to a mild, moderate, or severe infusion reaction is important. Response cards should be available for easy reference for staff. The inclusion of a short form in a patientÆs file could quickly reveal history of allergies and other pertinent information. Oncology nurses should also be well-versed in emergency response protocol, including the need for emergency medications and quick retrieval of resuscitation equipment. Oncology nurses should be aware of the risk for infusion reaction. Knowledge of the appropriate emergency response is paramount. Severe infusion reactions are not common but this adverse event can be distressing to both nurses and patients and can lead to fatal outcomes in some patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfusion Reactions Associated with Monoclonal Antibodies: Issues for Oncology Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorViale, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Viale, RN, MS CS, ANP, AOCNP, Oncology Nurse Practitioner, Oncology Nurse Consultant and Nurse Practitioner, Saratoga, California, USA, email: p.viale@comcast.neten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164834-
dc.description.abstractEducation: Monoclonal antibodies are an important part of the armamentarium of therapeutics used to treat patients with cancer. Although the overall incidence of hypersensitivity reactions associated with chemotherapy treatments is approximately 5%, the incidence of infusion reactions with some monoclonal antibodies can be much higher. Infusion reactions can occur within minutes of drug administration or as a delayed response. Additionally, certain geographic areas have been linked to higher infusion reactions rates with specific antibodies. Oncology nurses attending the Oncology Nursing Society's Annual Meeting in 2005 were surveyed about their perceptions regarding infusion reactions showing that these common reactions can be emotionally difficult for nurses and patients. Schwartzberg et al conducted a retrospective chart review of severe infusion reactions and also noted that these events are challenging for patients and staff, with potential for increased hospitalization costs. The purpose of this presentation is to describe monoclonal antibodies at risk for infusion reaction, and strategies to manage this common, yet sometimes fatal adverse event. Obtaining a comprehensive allergy history and knowledge of specific patient groups at risk, including awareness of the potential for geographic differences in the allergic response rate for specific medications are all important strategies in the identification of patients at risk. Clinical pathways, algorithms, and directives would benefit clinicians in preparing a planned approach to infusion reactions. Achieving competency in the management of infusion reactions is essential. Performing mock training for staff on responding to a mild, moderate, or severe infusion reaction is important. Response cards should be available for easy reference for staff. The inclusion of a short form in a patientÆs file could quickly reveal history of allergies and other pertinent information. Oncology nurses should also be well-versed in emergency response protocol, including the need for emergency medications and quick retrieval of resuscitation equipment. Oncology nurses should be aware of the risk for infusion reaction. Knowledge of the appropriate emergency response is paramount. Severe infusion reactions are not common but this adverse event can be distressing to both nurses and patients and can lead to fatal outcomes in some patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:51Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.