Self-Assessment of Patients' Knowledge and Adherence to Oral Chemotherapy Medications

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164835
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Assessment of Patients' Knowledge and Adherence to Oral Chemotherapy Medications
Author(s):
Vinson, Mary; Thomas-Welch, Kathy; Wen, Lonnie; Stein, Betsy
Author Details:
Mary Vinson, RN, MSN, OCN, Nurse Manager, Texas Oncology, Dallas, Texas, USA, email: mary.vinson@usoncology.com; Kathy Thomas-Welch, LMSW, OSW-C, Baylor U. Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; Lonnie Wen, RPh, PhD, Pfizer Oncology, New York, New York; Betsy Stein, BA, CRC, Baylor Research Institute, Dallas, Texas
Abstract:
Research Study: Over recent years, there has been an increase in the use of oral chemotherapy agents for the treatment of different malignancies. The availability of oral chemotherapy agents that can be administered outside the hospital or infusion clinic presents new challenges to the healthcare practitioner in managing cancer treatment. Side effects and patient non-adherence to the treatment regimen can cause problems. Nurses play a key role in improving medication adherence The purpose is to provide nurses and other health care practitioners with information regarding patient's knowledge of their oral chemotherapy medication and patient's medication taking behavior. The information-motivation-behavioral skills model (IMB model) is used to describe the medication taking behavior of the patients. In the IMB model, the presence of both information and motivation can increase the likelihood of adherence. A convenience sample from the Oncology/Hematology clinics of a large urban community cancer center will be used. Surveys will be collected from 1/21/2008 to 1/30/2009. Patients currently prescribed oral chemotherapy agents are asked to complete a 12 item survey that assesses knowledge regarding medication, barriers associated with adherence and medication taking behavior. This is an exploratory study and descriptive and univariate statistics will be used. As of 12/10/2008, 131 patients completed the survey. The six most common oral chemotherapy medications include: hydroxyurea (29.1%),imatanib (10.2%), capecitabine (7.8%), thalidomide (7.1%); sunitinib (6.3%); and sorafanib (5.5%). Over 90% of respondents indicated they understood "why you are taking the medicine," "how much to take," "when to take it," "where to keep the medicine," "if and when to get a refill," and "who to call with questions, concerns or side effects." Eighty-two percent indicated they "know about possible side effects and what to do about them," 12% "were not sure" and 4.6% indicated "no." Eighty-seven percent indicated they read printed materials about medication, and 80% understand the materials. Thirty-seven percent indicated they "skipped or forgot some doses" and 26.7% "took some doses late". Nurses can be instrumental in developing interventions that will provide support for adherence and understanding possible side effects of their medication.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Source: Partially funded by Pfizer Oncology.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Assessment of Patients' Knowledge and Adherence to Oral Chemotherapy Medicationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVinson, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas-Welch, Kathyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWen, Lonnieen_US
dc.contributor.authorStein, Betsyen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Vinson, RN, MSN, OCN, Nurse Manager, Texas Oncology, Dallas, Texas, USA, email: mary.vinson@usoncology.com; Kathy Thomas-Welch, LMSW, OSW-C, Baylor U. Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; Lonnie Wen, RPh, PhD, Pfizer Oncology, New York, New York; Betsy Stein, BA, CRC, Baylor Research Institute, Dallas, Texasen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164835-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Over recent years, there has been an increase in the use of oral chemotherapy agents for the treatment of different malignancies. The availability of oral chemotherapy agents that can be administered outside the hospital or infusion clinic presents new challenges to the healthcare practitioner in managing cancer treatment. Side effects and patient non-adherence to the treatment regimen can cause problems. Nurses play a key role in improving medication adherence The purpose is to provide nurses and other health care practitioners with information regarding patient's knowledge of their oral chemotherapy medication and patient's medication taking behavior. The information-motivation-behavioral skills model (IMB model) is used to describe the medication taking behavior of the patients. In the IMB model, the presence of both information and motivation can increase the likelihood of adherence. A convenience sample from the Oncology/Hematology clinics of a large urban community cancer center will be used. Surveys will be collected from 1/21/2008 to 1/30/2009. Patients currently prescribed oral chemotherapy agents are asked to complete a 12 item survey that assesses knowledge regarding medication, barriers associated with adherence and medication taking behavior. This is an exploratory study and descriptive and univariate statistics will be used. As of 12/10/2008, 131 patients completed the survey. The six most common oral chemotherapy medications include: hydroxyurea (29.1%),imatanib (10.2%), capecitabine (7.8%), thalidomide (7.1%); sunitinib (6.3%); and sorafanib (5.5%). Over 90% of respondents indicated they understood "why you are taking the medicine," "how much to take," "when to take it," "where to keep the medicine," "if and when to get a refill," and "who to call with questions, concerns or side effects." Eighty-two percent indicated they "know about possible side effects and what to do about them," 12% "were not sure" and 4.6% indicated "no." Eighty-seven percent indicated they read printed materials about medication, and 80% understand the materials. Thirty-seven percent indicated they "skipped or forgot some doses" and 26.7% "took some doses late". Nurses can be instrumental in developing interventions that will provide support for adherence and understanding possible side effects of their medication.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:52Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Source: Partially funded by Pfizer Oncology.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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