2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164836
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Inflammatory Breast Cancer: Breast Cancer with no Lump?
Author(s):
Vranas, Pamela
Author Details:
Pamela Vranas, RN, ONP, MS, AOCN, Oncology Nurse Practitioner, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: pvranas@mdanderson.org
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare form of breast cancer which accounts for only about 1% to 5% of all cases of breast cancers, but it is a highly aggressive disease with a poor prognosis (5 year survival rate of 40%). Symptoms can progress in only a few weeks and lymph nodes are generally involved on presentation. Patients are frequently misdiagnosed, therefore prompt diagnosing and treatment is key to increasing survival. Oncology nurses serve as the front line to the care for patients and it is important that they realize how to recognize the disease, the urgency of this disease and how they best assist their patients. The purpose of this activity is to familiarize the attendees with how IBC clinically presents, how it is diagnosed, overview of treatment options, and learn how they can effectively assist their patients. This activity will review the signs/symptoms of how IBC presents, what tests are used to diagnose it, and review treatment options. Several case studies will be used to further solidify the information. The goal of this activity is for oncology nurses to be become familiarized with how IBC presents, how it is diagnosed, treatment options, and how they can support their patients emotionally and physically throughout the therapy. The attendees will then be able to effectively intervene with the patients through the continuum of care appropriately. Patients with IBC are generally younger, frequently misdiagnosed, and generally very frustrated and worried upon presenting to the oncologist. The challenges to oncology nurses are unique in this population. The patients are seeking accurate information, treatment and hope, but all they find is misinformation and dismal statistics. Oncology nurses are the key to providing patients with accurate education, emotional support, directing them to appropriate resources, and providing them with the hope and support needed to fight this deadly disease. With better understanding of the aggressiveness of IBC and treatments, they can provide better support services to the patient and their families.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInflammatory Breast Cancer: Breast Cancer with no Lump?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorVranas, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Vranas, RN, ONP, MS, AOCN, Oncology Nurse Practitioner, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: pvranas@mdanderson.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164836-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare form of breast cancer which accounts for only about 1% to 5% of all cases of breast cancers, but it is a highly aggressive disease with a poor prognosis (5 year survival rate of 40%). Symptoms can progress in only a few weeks and lymph nodes are generally involved on presentation. Patients are frequently misdiagnosed, therefore prompt diagnosing and treatment is key to increasing survival. Oncology nurses serve as the front line to the care for patients and it is important that they realize how to recognize the disease, the urgency of this disease and how they best assist their patients. The purpose of this activity is to familiarize the attendees with how IBC clinically presents, how it is diagnosed, overview of treatment options, and learn how they can effectively assist their patients. This activity will review the signs/symptoms of how IBC presents, what tests are used to diagnose it, and review treatment options. Several case studies will be used to further solidify the information. The goal of this activity is for oncology nurses to be become familiarized with how IBC presents, how it is diagnosed, treatment options, and how they can support their patients emotionally and physically throughout the therapy. The attendees will then be able to effectively intervene with the patients through the continuum of care appropriately. Patients with IBC are generally younger, frequently misdiagnosed, and generally very frustrated and worried upon presenting to the oncologist. The challenges to oncology nurses are unique in this population. The patients are seeking accurate information, treatment and hope, but all they find is misinformation and dismal statistics. Oncology nurses are the key to providing patients with accurate education, emotional support, directing them to appropriate resources, and providing them with the hope and support needed to fight this deadly disease. With better understanding of the aggressiveness of IBC and treatments, they can provide better support services to the patient and their families.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:53Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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