2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164837
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Wellness Coaching and Cancer Care
Author(s):
Waddington, Cynthia; Bailiff, Michelle
Author Details:
Cynthia Waddington, RN, MSN, AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Christian Care Health System, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: cwaddington@christianacare.org; Michelle Bailiff, LCSW
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: It is well established that cancer risk, survival, and recurrence can be attributed to lifestyle practices such as diet, physical activity, weight, and tobacco product exposure. These practices also impact the management of cancer treatment and resulting side effects. Changing lifestyle practices is a dynamic and complicated process. Nurses in various settings are in a position to coach patients in making healthy, lasting, lifestyle change. The purpose of this poster is to describe the wellness coaching process as used in the care of cancer patients, survivors, caregivers and those at high risk for cancer. Wellness coaches work with patients in weight management, physical activity, nutrition, stress management, health, and life issues which impact wellness. Coaches blend proven behavior change techniques with interventions intended to inspire personal growth. The use of inquiry, reflection and mindful listening leads the patient to significant personal discovery which results in increased insight and awareness. This awareness guides patients in making sustainable changes in self-understanding, self-concept, and behavior while reaching behavioral and outcome goals. Regular (usually weekly) face-to-face or telephone coaching sessions take place over a minimum of three months. The first session includes development of a wellness vision, identification of motivators, obstacles and strategies to overcome obstacles, and three month goals. Following sessions include a patient review of their experience related to their goals, processing of obstacles and exploring additional areas of interest. Weekly goals (leading to attainment of three month goals) are made at each session. Outcome measurements completed after three months of coaching include the categories of wellness addressed and the percent of weekly and three month goals attained. Results will provide a foundation for which continuing nursing education is offered as well as a basis for nursing-collaborative directed patient programs. Nurses may practice in the role of a wellness coach or simply incorporate coaching skills to support the change process in their current practice with individuals, groups, or topic specific programs. Community and worksite health promotion programs and health insurance providers are additional opportunities to utilize nurse coaching as a structure to support adherence to positive health practices.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWellness Coaching and Cancer Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWaddington, Cynthiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBailiff, Michelleen_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Waddington, RN, MSN, AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Christian Care Health System, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: cwaddington@christianacare.org; Michelle Bailiff, LCSWen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164837-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: It is well established that cancer risk, survival, and recurrence can be attributed to lifestyle practices such as diet, physical activity, weight, and tobacco product exposure. These practices also impact the management of cancer treatment and resulting side effects. Changing lifestyle practices is a dynamic and complicated process. Nurses in various settings are in a position to coach patients in making healthy, lasting, lifestyle change. The purpose of this poster is to describe the wellness coaching process as used in the care of cancer patients, survivors, caregivers and those at high risk for cancer. Wellness coaches work with patients in weight management, physical activity, nutrition, stress management, health, and life issues which impact wellness. Coaches blend proven behavior change techniques with interventions intended to inspire personal growth. The use of inquiry, reflection and mindful listening leads the patient to significant personal discovery which results in increased insight and awareness. This awareness guides patients in making sustainable changes in self-understanding, self-concept, and behavior while reaching behavioral and outcome goals. Regular (usually weekly) face-to-face or telephone coaching sessions take place over a minimum of three months. The first session includes development of a wellness vision, identification of motivators, obstacles and strategies to overcome obstacles, and three month goals. Following sessions include a patient review of their experience related to their goals, processing of obstacles and exploring additional areas of interest. Weekly goals (leading to attainment of three month goals) are made at each session. Outcome measurements completed after three months of coaching include the categories of wellness addressed and the percent of weekly and three month goals attained. Results will provide a foundation for which continuing nursing education is offered as well as a basis for nursing-collaborative directed patient programs. Nurses may practice in the role of a wellness coach or simply incorporate coaching skills to support the change process in their current practice with individuals, groups, or topic specific programs. Community and worksite health promotion programs and health insurance providers are additional opportunities to utilize nurse coaching as a structure to support adherence to positive health practices.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:07:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:07:54Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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