A Systematic Review of Literature Related to Measurement of Adherence to Oral Cancer Therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164843
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Systematic Review of Literature Related to Measurement of Adherence to Oral Cancer Therapy
Author(s):
Wickersham, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Wickersham, RN, BSN to PhD Student, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, email: wickster12@comcast.net
Abstract:
Research Study: Traditionally, cancer has been treated with surgery, radiation therapy, and/or chemotherapy. However, the advent of the use of oral targeted cancer therapies has shifted the responsibility for monitoring and managing adherence to therapy from health care providers to patients. Adherence to oral cancer therapies has not been well-documented. Furthermore, adherence knowledge for patients with cancer is largely based on studies of tamoxifen, which have methodologic concerns including concerns about approaches to measurement of adherence to oral cancer therapy. The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the literature related to measurement of adherence to oral targeted therapy with EGFR inhibitors in patients with NSCLC (ONS research priority 5.1 treatment adherence). A systematic review of the literature was performed during Spring 2008. Studies were identified through database searches, including Medline, CINHAL, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Key search terms included: interventions, self-report, drug monitoring, medication adherence, medication compliance, patient compliance, carcinoma-non-small cell lung, receptor-epidermal growth factor, and antineoplastics agents. Fifty-four articles were initially retrieved. Findings were further limited to studies specifically comparing the use of electronic adherence monitoring to at least self-report, producing six quantitative studies examining the use of self-report and electronic monitoring of medication adherence. Only two studies examining medication adherence in patients with cancer receiving oral anticancer therapy were found. All studies specifically measured medication adherence using electronic monitoring; five directly compared electronic monitoring with patient self-report. Four included evaluations or comparisons with other traditional adherence measurements such as pill counts, plasma levels, or pharmacy record review. All studies included convenience samples; only one study included an element of randomization. In most cases, reviewed studies suggested self-report overestimated adherence, while electronic monitoring underestimated adherence. Based on criteria adapted from McMaster University, the quality of individual studies was assessed as Level V for 5 of the 6 studies; one was categorized as a Level 4. All were well-designed, non-experimental studies that provided clear support for the use of electronic adherence monitoring. Future studies of adherence to cancer therapies should include electronic adherence measurement.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Systematic Review of Literature Related to Measurement of Adherence to Oral Cancer Therapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWickersham, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Wickersham, RN, BSN to PhD Student, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, email: wickster12@comcast.neten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164843-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Traditionally, cancer has been treated with surgery, radiation therapy, and/or chemotherapy. However, the advent of the use of oral targeted cancer therapies has shifted the responsibility for monitoring and managing adherence to therapy from health care providers to patients. Adherence to oral cancer therapies has not been well-documented. Furthermore, adherence knowledge for patients with cancer is largely based on studies of tamoxifen, which have methodologic concerns including concerns about approaches to measurement of adherence to oral cancer therapy. The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the literature related to measurement of adherence to oral targeted therapy with EGFR inhibitors in patients with NSCLC (ONS research priority 5.1 treatment adherence). A systematic review of the literature was performed during Spring 2008. Studies were identified through database searches, including Medline, CINHAL, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Key search terms included: interventions, self-report, drug monitoring, medication adherence, medication compliance, patient compliance, carcinoma-non-small cell lung, receptor-epidermal growth factor, and antineoplastics agents. Fifty-four articles were initially retrieved. Findings were further limited to studies specifically comparing the use of electronic adherence monitoring to at least self-report, producing six quantitative studies examining the use of self-report and electronic monitoring of medication adherence. Only two studies examining medication adherence in patients with cancer receiving oral anticancer therapy were found. All studies specifically measured medication adherence using electronic monitoring; five directly compared electronic monitoring with patient self-report. Four included evaluations or comparisons with other traditional adherence measurements such as pill counts, plasma levels, or pharmacy record review. All studies included convenience samples; only one study included an element of randomization. In most cases, reviewed studies suggested self-report overestimated adherence, while electronic monitoring underestimated adherence. Based on criteria adapted from McMaster University, the quality of individual studies was assessed as Level V for 5 of the 6 studies; one was categorized as a Level 4. All were well-designed, non-experimental studies that provided clear support for the use of electronic adherence monitoring. Future studies of adherence to cancer therapies should include electronic adherence measurement.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:00Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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