USE OF A BODY MASS INDEX (BMI) CALCULATOR TO IDENTIFY OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS (AYA) PATIENTS IN A CHILDHOOD CANCER SURVIVORSHIP CLINIC

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164845
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
USE OF A BODY MASS INDEX (BMI) CALCULATOR TO IDENTIFY OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS (AYA) PATIENTS IN A CHILDHOOD CANCER SURVIVORSHIP CLINIC
Author(s):
Wilson, Karla; Landier, Wendy; Bhatt, Dhvani; Arewwasikporn, Anne; Francisco, Liton; Herrera, Claudia; Bhatia, Smita
Author Details:
Karla Wilson, RN, MSN, FNP, CPON, Nurse Practitioner, City of Hope, Duarte, California, USA, email: kwilson@coh.org; Wendy Landier, RN, MSN, CPNP, CPON; Dhvani Bhatt, RD; Anne Arewwasikporn, BA; Liton Francisco, BS; Claudia Herrera, CRA; Smita Bhatia, MD, MPH
Abstract:
Education: Being overweight or obese is a well known problem in the general population and in some subsets of childhood cancer survivors. Control or prevention of obesity may assume even greater importance when adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors have received treatment predisposing them to conditions linked with excessive weight, such as dyslipidemia, type II diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. The purpose was to determine the overweight or obesity status of patients being seen in the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Clinic in order to customize patient education related to diet, exercise, and their specific potential health risks associated with excessive weight. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated using the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) website (http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/ dnpa/healthyweight/assessing/bmi/index.htm). Patients were categorized as normal (BMI < 25 kg/m2), overweight (BMI 25 - < 30 kg/m2) or obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2); calculations were adjusted for survivors < 18 years of age using the International Obesity Task Force methodology. Overweight and obese AYAs received tailored education from the nurse practitioner or physician addressing their specific therapy-related risks for metabolic and cardiovascular disease. The clinical dietician performed a nutritional assessment based on dietary and exercise habits and provided weight management counseling, including recommendations for appropriate dietary intake and suggestions for heart-healthy physical activities. Written materials were provided regarding beneficial food choices and initiation of weight loss and exercise programs. Of the 315 patients in the City of Hope (COH) program, 222 (221 evaluable)were between the ages of 15-39 years at their initial visit. Fifty-two percent (116) of these AYA survivors were either overweight or obese. Being overweight or obese may have an even greater impact on the general health of AYA survivors as they age due to previous cancer treatments associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, and other late effects that may be exacerbated by excessive weight and sedentary lifestyle. Consequently, health care providers should be vigilant in providing follow-up care for AYA cancer survivors that incorporates annual monitoring of BMI and physical activity, while patient education should include a focus on interventions to promote healthy eating, physical activity, and weight management.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUSE OF A BODY MASS INDEX (BMI) CALCULATOR TO IDENTIFY OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS (AYA) PATIENTS IN A CHILDHOOD CANCER SURVIVORSHIP CLINICen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Karlaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLandier, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBhatt, Dhvanien_US
dc.contributor.authorArewwasikporn, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorFrancisco, Litonen_US
dc.contributor.authorHerrera, Claudiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBhatia, Smitaen_US
dc.author.detailsKarla Wilson, RN, MSN, FNP, CPON, Nurse Practitioner, City of Hope, Duarte, California, USA, email: kwilson@coh.org; Wendy Landier, RN, MSN, CPNP, CPON; Dhvani Bhatt, RD; Anne Arewwasikporn, BA; Liton Francisco, BS; Claudia Herrera, CRA; Smita Bhatia, MD, MPHen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164845-
dc.description.abstractEducation: Being overweight or obese is a well known problem in the general population and in some subsets of childhood cancer survivors. Control or prevention of obesity may assume even greater importance when adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors have received treatment predisposing them to conditions linked with excessive weight, such as dyslipidemia, type II diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. The purpose was to determine the overweight or obesity status of patients being seen in the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Clinic in order to customize patient education related to diet, exercise, and their specific potential health risks associated with excessive weight. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated using the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) website (http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/ dnpa/healthyweight/assessing/bmi/index.htm). Patients were categorized as normal (BMI &lt; 25 kg/m2), overweight (BMI 25 - &lt; 30 kg/m2) or obese (BMI &gt; 30 kg/m2); calculations were adjusted for survivors &lt; 18 years of age using the International Obesity Task Force methodology. Overweight and obese AYAs received tailored education from the nurse practitioner or physician addressing their specific therapy-related risks for metabolic and cardiovascular disease. The clinical dietician performed a nutritional assessment based on dietary and exercise habits and provided weight management counseling, including recommendations for appropriate dietary intake and suggestions for heart-healthy physical activities. Written materials were provided regarding beneficial food choices and initiation of weight loss and exercise programs. Of the 315 patients in the City of Hope (COH) program, 222 (221 evaluable)were between the ages of 15-39 years at their initial visit. Fifty-two percent (116) of these AYA survivors were either overweight or obese. Being overweight or obese may have an even greater impact on the general health of AYA survivors as they age due to previous cancer treatments associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, and other late effects that may be exacerbated by excessive weight and sedentary lifestyle. Consequently, health care providers should be vigilant in providing follow-up care for AYA cancer survivors that incorporates annual monitoring of BMI and physical activity, while patient education should include a focus on interventions to promote healthy eating, physical activity, and weight management.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:02Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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