Optimizing Vitamin D Status to Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk: A Review of Evidence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164852
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Optimizing Vitamin D Status to Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk: A Review of Evidence
Author(s):
Zhou, Guiyun
Author Details:
Guiyun Zhou, MSN, CRNP, AOCNS, Vita Hemtology Oncology, P.C, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA, email: guiyunzhou@hotmail.com
Abstract:
Research Study: Vitamin D deficiency is common in both the general public and oncology population. Optimizing vitamin D status is increasingly recognized in cancer risk reduction, with specific, evidence of substantial decrease in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Therefore, it is important to summarize the current clinical evidence to promote the best practice. The primary objective of this evidentiary review is to examine the current research evidence regarding vitamin D's impact on CRC risk reduction. The secondary objective is to provide practice recommendations for clinicians. Following a literature search, research articles from 2002-2008 were retrieved from varieties of electronic databases. Reference lists of relevant articles were also manually searched. Twenty-four research reports were selected for review, including four studies from randomized clinical trials (RCTs), ten cohort or case-control studies measuring serum 25-OH-D level as the main research variable, and ten cohort studies reporting vitamin D intakes. Result: Higher vitamin D intakes, in general, were found to decrease CRC risk. Effective vitamin D intakes that raise 25-OH-D level to the vitamin D sufficient state of 32-100ng/mL were shown to reduce CRC risk by about 40-60%. Vitamin D 1000 IU daily is safe and likely sufficient to raise 25-OH-D level into the range required to achieve CRC risk reduction. Practice recommendations, such as counseling patients about vitamin D intakes, correcting vitamin D deficiency and maintaining 25-OH-D level in the range of 32-100ng/mL, are supported by this review. Implication and Conclusion: Considering that over 50% of Americans and 80% of cancer survivors are taking dietary supplements without clinical advice and acknowledging the overall safety profile of vitamin D and its wide range of health benefits, it is reasonable to make practical recommendations of vitamin D 1000 IU daily. Besides, it is important to correct vitamin D deficiency and to maintain an optimal 25-OH-D level range. However, using effective doses of vitamin D in longitudinal RCTs with large population-based samples is needed for more definitive evidences. At present, clinicians must consider the current evidences, patients' condition and preferences, and use own clinical judgment when addressing the need for vitamin D supplementation for their patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOptimizing Vitamin D Status to Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk: A Review of Evidenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Guiyunen_US
dc.author.detailsGuiyun Zhou, MSN, CRNP, AOCNS, Vita Hemtology Oncology, P.C, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA, email: guiyunzhou@hotmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164852-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Vitamin D deficiency is common in both the general public and oncology population. Optimizing vitamin D status is increasingly recognized in cancer risk reduction, with specific, evidence of substantial decrease in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Therefore, it is important to summarize the current clinical evidence to promote the best practice. The primary objective of this evidentiary review is to examine the current research evidence regarding vitamin D's impact on CRC risk reduction. The secondary objective is to provide practice recommendations for clinicians. Following a literature search, research articles from 2002-2008 were retrieved from varieties of electronic databases. Reference lists of relevant articles were also manually searched. Twenty-four research reports were selected for review, including four studies from randomized clinical trials (RCTs), ten cohort or case-control studies measuring serum 25-OH-D level as the main research variable, and ten cohort studies reporting vitamin D intakes. Result: Higher vitamin D intakes, in general, were found to decrease CRC risk. Effective vitamin D intakes that raise 25-OH-D level to the vitamin D sufficient state of 32-100ng/mL were shown to reduce CRC risk by about 40-60%. Vitamin D 1000 IU daily is safe and likely sufficient to raise 25-OH-D level into the range required to achieve CRC risk reduction. Practice recommendations, such as counseling patients about vitamin D intakes, correcting vitamin D deficiency and maintaining 25-OH-D level in the range of 32-100ng/mL, are supported by this review. Implication and Conclusion: Considering that over 50% of Americans and 80% of cancer survivors are taking dietary supplements without clinical advice and acknowledging the overall safety profile of vitamin D and its wide range of health benefits, it is reasonable to make practical recommendations of vitamin D 1000 IU daily. Besides, it is important to correct vitamin D deficiency and to maintain an optimal 25-OH-D level range. However, using effective doses of vitamin D in longitudinal RCTs with large population-based samples is needed for more definitive evidences. At present, clinicians must consider the current evidences, patients' condition and preferences, and use own clinical judgment when addressing the need for vitamin D supplementation for their patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:10Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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