Age at Diagnosis and Years of Survival Both Influence Quality of Life Outcomes in Long-Term Survivors of Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164853
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Age at Diagnosis and Years of Survival Both Influence Quality of Life Outcomes in Long-Term Survivors of Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Cimprich, Bernadine
Author Details:
Bernadine Cimprich, Associate Professor, University of Michigan, School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, email: cimprich@umich.edu
Abstract:
A life stage perspective has seldom been used to understand the impact of breast cancer and its treatment on quality of life (QOL) outcomes. Little information exists about how age at diagnosis and years of survival might influence QOL outcomes in long-term survivors of breast cancer. Thus, tailored cost-effective services that respond to needs of breast cancer survivors at each life stage are yet to be determined. The study objectives were to examine: 1) whether there were differences in QOL outcomes in long-term survivors of breast cancer based on age at diagnosis; and 2) the influence of age at diagnosis and years of survival, along with treatment and demographic variables on QOL outcomes. The conceptual framework is based on Rowland’s developmental model linking life stage at diagnosis to issues and needs of cancer survivors. Quality of life outcomes are defined and measured using Ferrell, et al.’s theoretical model for cancer survivors. The sample consisted of 105 long-term survivors of breast cancer (5-50 yrs after diagnosis; M = 12 yrs) with no history of recurrence, who were randomly selected from a cancer center Tumor Registry. The Quality of Life-Cancer Survivors (QOL-CS) scale with known validity and reliability was used to assess QOL outcomes in four domains, physical, psychological, social and spiritual. The sample was stratified based on age at diagnosis: younger <45 yrs (N = 42); middle 45 – 65 yrs (n = 35); and older .65 yrs (n = 28). One-way ANOVAs showed significant (p <,05) differences among the three age grounds in mean scores on the physical and social domains, but not the other domains. Post hoc comparisons (Scheffe method) showed that the older group scored significantly lower (worse) in physical outcomes, while the younger group scored significantly lower in social outcomes than the other groups. Regression analyses also indicated a non-linear relationship between age at diagnosis and physical outcomes (p =.001) and the overall QOL-CS score (p = .057), with the middle age group showing higher (better) mean scores than the younger or older groups. A regression model was constructed to determine the influence of age at diagnosis, years of survival, treatment, and demographic variables on QOL outcomes. The final model accounted for 20% - 23% of the variance in overall QOL-CS score and in the physical, social, and psychological domains, with age at diagnosis and years of survival explaining most of the variance in these scores. These findings indicate that life stage at diagnosis and years of survival both influence QOL outcomes. Long-term survivors of breast cancer diagnosed at an older age reported poorer physical well-being, while those diagnosed at a younger age reported poorer social well-being. Long-term survivors diagnosed in middle age tended to report better overall QOL outcomes than those diagnosed at younger or older ages. The findings provide a first step in identifying specific issues and service needs that are relevant at each life stage and than can improve QOL of survivors of breast cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAge at Diagnosis and Years of Survival Both Influence Quality of Life Outcomes in Long-Term Survivors of Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCimprich, Bernadineen_US
dc.author.detailsBernadine Cimprich, Associate Professor, University of Michigan, School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, email: cimprich@umich.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164853-
dc.description.abstractA life stage perspective has seldom been used to understand the impact of breast cancer and its treatment on quality of life (QOL) outcomes. Little information exists about how age at diagnosis and years of survival might influence QOL outcomes in long-term survivors of breast cancer. Thus, tailored cost-effective services that respond to needs of breast cancer survivors at each life stage are yet to be determined. The study objectives were to examine: 1) whether there were differences in QOL outcomes in long-term survivors of breast cancer based on age at diagnosis; and 2) the influence of age at diagnosis and years of survival, along with treatment and demographic variables on QOL outcomes. The conceptual framework is based on Rowland&rsquo;s developmental model linking life stage at diagnosis to issues and needs of cancer survivors. Quality of life outcomes are defined and measured using Ferrell, et al.&rsquo;s theoretical model for cancer survivors. The sample consisted of 105 long-term survivors of breast cancer (5-50 yrs after diagnosis; M = 12 yrs) with no history of recurrence, who were randomly selected from a cancer center Tumor Registry. The Quality of Life-Cancer Survivors (QOL-CS) scale with known validity and reliability was used to assess QOL outcomes in four domains, physical, psychological, social and spiritual. The sample was stratified based on age at diagnosis: younger &lt;45 yrs (N = 42); middle 45 &ndash; 65 yrs (n = 35); and older .65 yrs (n = 28). One-way ANOVAs showed significant (p &lt;,05) differences among the three age grounds in mean scores on the physical and social domains, but not the other domains. Post hoc comparisons (Scheffe method) showed that the older group scored significantly lower (worse) in physical outcomes, while the younger group scored significantly lower in social outcomes than the other groups. Regression analyses also indicated a non-linear relationship between age at diagnosis and physical outcomes (p =.001) and the overall QOL-CS score (p = .057), with the middle age group showing higher (better) mean scores than the younger or older groups. A regression model was constructed to determine the influence of age at diagnosis, years of survival, treatment, and demographic variables on QOL outcomes. The final model accounted for 20% - 23% of the variance in overall QOL-CS score and in the physical, social, and psychological domains, with age at diagnosis and years of survival explaining most of the variance in these scores. These findings indicate that life stage at diagnosis and years of survival both influence QOL outcomes. Long-term survivors of breast cancer diagnosed at an older age reported poorer physical well-being, while those diagnosed at a younger age reported poorer social well-being. Long-term survivors diagnosed in middle age tended to report better overall QOL outcomes than those diagnosed at younger or older ages. The findings provide a first step in identifying specific issues and service needs that are relevant at each life stage and than can improve QOL of survivors of breast cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:11Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.