2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164854
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Grief And Bereavement After A Transplant Related Death
Author(s):
Eilers, June
Author Details:
June Eilers, PhD, Nebraska Health System, University Hospital, Ralston, Nebraska, USA
Abstract:
Although the amount of grief and bereavement literature and research has increased, in oncology most of the focus has been on hospice and palliative care, where death is an anticipated outcome. For marrow transplant families who come to treatment with the paradox of "hoping for the best" (overcome disease) and "fearing the worst" (premature death), death may lead to a different bereavement experience. Studies to date, have not focused on bereavement in these families. Since the number of transplants performed with life threatening situations continues to escalate, this is an area in need of attention. The theoretical framework for this descriptive study viewed the death of a loved one as a stressor for family members of transplant patients that died. The death and consequential grief then have the potential to significantly change the individual's life. Knowledge regarding the bereavement experience of individuals experiencing the death of a loved one in marrow transplant, and evaluation of the support received can guide the development and testing of future interventions to promote healthy adaptation. The purpose of this study was to gain an increased understanding of the bereavement experience of family members of transplant patients who had died. The mailed survey instruments included a study specific Demographic and Situational Data Sheet, including evaluation questions regarding support they had received, and the Grief Experience Inventory (GEI), a literature and research based instrument with reported validity and reliability. Addresses were available for 89 of the 110 potential subjects from a four year to prepare in advance for period; 62% responded, 7 were returned blank, for a 54% completion rate. Preliminary data analysis indicates the majority of the subjects were white, 25-80 years old, a spouse of the deceased, and living alone. They had children, and an identified religious preference. They had not changed their occupation or relocated, and felt staff had been "moderately" to "extremely" sensitive to their needs. However, for the majority, hospital staff had not "helped to explain the feelings they might experience" or "answered questions about grief". Written materials received and follow-up contacts were identified as "somewhat" helpful. Scores on the GEI subscales were highest for "Despair" and lowest for "Guilt" and "Social Isolation". This pattern is similar to data reported by Sanders in a comparison of bereavement outcomes after a sudden, versus long-term illness death; and another study after the death of a spouse, parent, or child. Sample size did not allow statistical comparison across sub-groups of subjects based on time since the death, or relationship to the deceased. Study findings provide pilot data to guide future studies and aid the evaluation of the bereavement program at our center. Further research is needed to determine if there are factors that could be seen as predictive of a complicated bereavement experience and if these individuals experience phases of grief similar to those reported in palliative care. A philosophy of "don't give up till the very end", may interfere with the ability of the family the grief experience. Once the death occurs, the family returns home, often great distances from the treatment center, thus limiting staff's participation in the grief process. However, staff may benefit from education regarding the death experience for the family members.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGrief And Bereavement After A Transplant Related Deathen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEilers, Juneen_US
dc.author.detailsJune Eilers, PhD, Nebraska Health System, University Hospital, Ralston, Nebraska, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164854-
dc.description.abstractAlthough the amount of grief and bereavement literature and research has increased, in oncology most of the focus has been on hospice and palliative care, where death is an anticipated outcome. For marrow transplant families who come to treatment with the paradox of "hoping for the best" (overcome disease) and "fearing the worst" (premature death), death may lead to a different bereavement experience. Studies to date, have not focused on bereavement in these families. Since the number of transplants performed with life threatening situations continues to escalate, this is an area in need of attention. The theoretical framework for this descriptive study viewed the death of a loved one as a stressor for family members of transplant patients that died. The death and consequential grief then have the potential to significantly change the individual's life. Knowledge regarding the bereavement experience of individuals experiencing the death of a loved one in marrow transplant, and evaluation of the support received can guide the development and testing of future interventions to promote healthy adaptation. The purpose of this study was to gain an increased understanding of the bereavement experience of family members of transplant patients who had died. The mailed survey instruments included a study specific Demographic and Situational Data Sheet, including evaluation questions regarding support they had received, and the Grief Experience Inventory (GEI), a literature and research based instrument with reported validity and reliability. Addresses were available for 89 of the 110 potential subjects from a four year to prepare in advance for period; 62% responded, 7 were returned blank, for a 54% completion rate. Preliminary data analysis indicates the majority of the subjects were white, 25-80 years old, a spouse of the deceased, and living alone. They had children, and an identified religious preference. They had not changed their occupation or relocated, and felt staff had been "moderately" to "extremely" sensitive to their needs. However, for the majority, hospital staff had not "helped to explain the feelings they might experience" or "answered questions about grief". Written materials received and follow-up contacts were identified as "somewhat" helpful. Scores on the GEI subscales were highest for "Despair" and lowest for "Guilt" and "Social Isolation". This pattern is similar to data reported by Sanders in a comparison of bereavement outcomes after a sudden, versus long-term illness death; and another study after the death of a spouse, parent, or child. Sample size did not allow statistical comparison across sub-groups of subjects based on time since the death, or relationship to the deceased. Study findings provide pilot data to guide future studies and aid the evaluation of the bereavement program at our center. Further research is needed to determine if there are factors that could be seen as predictive of a complicated bereavement experience and if these individuals experience phases of grief similar to those reported in palliative care. A philosophy of "don't give up till the very end", may interfere with the ability of the family the grief experience. Once the death occurs, the family returns home, often great distances from the treatment center, thus limiting staff's participation in the grief process. However, staff may benefit from education regarding the death experience for the family members.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:12Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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