2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164855
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Associated With Colorectal Cancer Screening Test Utilization
Author(s):
Menon, Usha
Author Details:
Usha Menon, MSN, University of Utah, College of Nursing, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, email: usha.menon@nurs.utah.edu
Abstract:
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. CRC develops from adenomatous polyps that can take several years to turn malignant. The early detection and removal of such polyps can decrease CRC morbidity and mortality. There is some controversy among the leading cancer organizations regarding appropriate tests and screening intervals. Fecal Occult Blood tests (FOBT) and flexible sigmoidoscopies are the more accepted modes of screening with colonoscopy recommended as a diagnostic test. The risk of developing CRC increases with age, with about 90% of new CRC cases being diagnosed in people 50 years and older. Utilization of these tests remains very low, especially among those aged 50 and older. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of predisposing and enabling factors on both FOBT and colonoscopy use. The theoretical framework for the study was a derived from the PRCEDE-PROCEED Model and the Health Belief Model. A random, cross-sectional sample of employees of a large Midwestern company, aged 50 and older were surveyed by mail about perceived barriers, benefits, self-efficacy, susceptibility, fear of and knowledge of CRC, provider recommendation, rapport and trust (communication) with their provider and past FOBT and colonoscopy use. These employees are offered a unique free CRC screening program through their employer. Instruments developed for this study were pilot tested and refined. All instruments had good reliability and validity scores. The response rate to the initial mailing was 47% leading to a final sample size of 213. A company cafeteria discount coupon was mailed with the survey as an incentive. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 10.5. Bivariate Chi Square analysis showed that those who had had an FOBT in the last year were significantly more likely to have higher knowledge of CRC, higher perceived susceptibility, lower barriers, and higher self-efficacy. Those who had a colonoscopy were significantly more likely to report increased trust and rapport with their provider, lower barriers, higher benefits, and higher self-efficacy. Provider recommendation was also significantly related to increased use of both tests. Binomial logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine the model best suited to predict FOBT and colonoscopy utilization. FOBT use was significantly predicted by the predisposing factors of perceived barriers (OR=.29, CI .13 - .61), perceived susceptibility (OR=2.13, CI 1.05 - 4.34), and education (OR=2.29, CI 1.06 - 4.92). Colonoscopy utilization was significantly predicted by perceived barriers (OR=.33,CI .13 - .87), perceived benefits (OR=2.96, CI 1.33 - 6.59), perceived self-efficacy (OR=2.83, CI 1.14 - 6.70), fear of CRC (OR=2.62, CI 1.13 - 6.07), and education (OR=.10, CI .02 - .53). Predictor variables differed between FOBT use and colonoscopy use. While there has been some research conducted on factors associated with FOBT use there is a dearth of such information on colonoscopy. Recent data indicate that there appears to be a shift in colonic neoplasms in the proximal versus the distal colon. If this trend continues colonoscopy may be the screening test of choice in the near future. Although these results cannot be generalized as yet to a community population, it gives researchers insight as to the factors that may influence increased screening behavior for both FOBT and colonoscopy.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Associated With Colorectal Cancer Screening Test Utilizationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMenon, Ushaen_US
dc.author.detailsUsha Menon, MSN, University of Utah, College of Nursing, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, email: usha.menon@nurs.utah.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164855-
dc.description.abstractColorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. CRC develops from adenomatous polyps that can take several years to turn malignant. The early detection and removal of such polyps can decrease CRC morbidity and mortality. There is some controversy among the leading cancer organizations regarding appropriate tests and screening intervals. Fecal Occult Blood tests (FOBT) and flexible sigmoidoscopies are the more accepted modes of screening with colonoscopy recommended as a diagnostic test. The risk of developing CRC increases with age, with about 90% of new CRC cases being diagnosed in people 50 years and older. Utilization of these tests remains very low, especially among those aged 50 and older. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of predisposing and enabling factors on both FOBT and colonoscopy use. The theoretical framework for the study was a derived from the PRCEDE-PROCEED Model and the Health Belief Model. A random, cross-sectional sample of employees of a large Midwestern company, aged 50 and older were surveyed by mail about perceived barriers, benefits, self-efficacy, susceptibility, fear of and knowledge of CRC, provider recommendation, rapport and trust (communication) with their provider and past FOBT and colonoscopy use. These employees are offered a unique free CRC screening program through their employer. Instruments developed for this study were pilot tested and refined. All instruments had good reliability and validity scores. The response rate to the initial mailing was 47% leading to a final sample size of 213. A company cafeteria discount coupon was mailed with the survey as an incentive. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 10.5. Bivariate Chi Square analysis showed that those who had had an FOBT in the last year were significantly more likely to have higher knowledge of CRC, higher perceived susceptibility, lower barriers, and higher self-efficacy. Those who had a colonoscopy were significantly more likely to report increased trust and rapport with their provider, lower barriers, higher benefits, and higher self-efficacy. Provider recommendation was also significantly related to increased use of both tests. Binomial logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine the model best suited to predict FOBT and colonoscopy utilization. FOBT use was significantly predicted by the predisposing factors of perceived barriers (OR=.29, CI .13 - .61), perceived susceptibility (OR=2.13, CI 1.05 - 4.34), and education (OR=2.29, CI 1.06 - 4.92). Colonoscopy utilization was significantly predicted by perceived barriers (OR=.33,CI .13 - .87), perceived benefits (OR=2.96, CI 1.33 - 6.59), perceived self-efficacy (OR=2.83, CI 1.14 - 6.70), fear of CRC (OR=2.62, CI 1.13 - 6.07), and education (OR=.10, CI .02 - .53). Predictor variables differed between FOBT use and colonoscopy use. While there has been some research conducted on factors associated with FOBT use there is a dearth of such information on colonoscopy. Recent data indicate that there appears to be a shift in colonic neoplasms in the proximal versus the distal colon. If this trend continues colonoscopy may be the screening test of choice in the near future. Although these results cannot be generalized as yet to a community population, it gives researchers insight as to the factors that may influence increased screening behavior for both FOBT and colonoscopy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:13Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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