Association Of Cancer Patients' Quality Of Life, Symptoms, Moods, And Self-Care Self-Efficacy With Family Caregivers' Depression, Reaction, And Health

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164857
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Association Of Cancer Patients' Quality Of Life, Symptoms, Moods, And Self-Care Self-Efficacy With Family Caregivers' Depression, Reaction, And Health
Author(s):
Lev, Elise
Author Details:
Elise Lev, EdD, Associate Professor, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: eliselev@nightingale.rutgers.edu
Abstract:
Significance/problem: Changes in the contemporary health care system have resulted in early discharge of hospital patients and increased numbers of cancer patients cared for at home. Family caregivers assume a growing responsibility for care of the patient at home. Self-efficacy is hypothesized to be one of the most important mediators of health behavior, a potent element in quality of life research, and a link between an individual’s psychosocial factors and outcomes. Purpose/framework: The purpose was to examine to what extent cancer patients’ quality of life, symptoms, moods, and self-care self-efficacy explain variation in caregivers’ depression, reaction, and health. The Pearlin, Mullan, Semple, and Skaff (1990) framework explaining variation in caregiver stress was examined. Indicators of the Pearlin model include biographic data of caregivers, variables indicative of the patients, reaction of caregivers, and health outcomes of caregivers. Methods/analysis: Data for the analysis were obtained from a longitudinal investigation of adjustment of 307 cancer patients. Measures included biographic data of caregivers, quality of life, symptoms, moods, and self-care self-efficacy of the patient and caregiver depression, reaction, and health. Sixty-five patient and caregiver dyads with complete data were used in the canonical analyses. The canonical approach was repeated three times, each occasion using a subset of 16 patient predictors regressed on the entire collection of 14 caregiver variables. The first two canonical analyses, using five quality of life scores, symptoms distress, and six mood distress scores, produced insignificant results. However, the final canonical analysis, using four factors measuring self-care self-efficacy did show significance (Chi-square=81.69, df=60, p=.03). The canonical correlation was .73 (R2 =.54). The largest standardized weights within each set of variables were used to define the pattern linking important patient and caregiver attributes. Themes of these linkages will be discussed. Findings and Implications: Pearlin and colleagues had suggested that caregivers’ coping and social support mediate caregivers’ stress. Results of this study suggest that patients’ self-efficacy may be a mediator of caregivers’ stress. Because of a relatively small number of dyads and a large number of variables, the canonical results should be treated as tentative. Health care professionals need to include caregivers in their delivery of patient care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssociation Of Cancer Patients' Quality Of Life, Symptoms, Moods, And Self-Care Self-Efficacy With Family Caregivers' Depression, Reaction, And Healthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLev, Eliseen_US
dc.author.detailsElise Lev, EdD, Associate Professor, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: eliselev@nightingale.rutgers.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164857-
dc.description.abstractSignificance/problem: Changes in the contemporary health care system have resulted in early discharge of hospital patients and increased numbers of cancer patients cared for at home. Family caregivers assume a growing responsibility for care of the patient at home. Self-efficacy is hypothesized to be one of the most important mediators of health behavior, a potent element in quality of life research, and a link between an individual’s psychosocial factors and outcomes. Purpose/framework: The purpose was to examine to what extent cancer patients’ quality of life, symptoms, moods, and self-care self-efficacy explain variation in caregivers’ depression, reaction, and health. The Pearlin, Mullan, Semple, and Skaff (1990) framework explaining variation in caregiver stress was examined. Indicators of the Pearlin model include biographic data of caregivers, variables indicative of the patients, reaction of caregivers, and health outcomes of caregivers. Methods/analysis: Data for the analysis were obtained from a longitudinal investigation of adjustment of 307 cancer patients. Measures included biographic data of caregivers, quality of life, symptoms, moods, and self-care self-efficacy of the patient and caregiver depression, reaction, and health. Sixty-five patient and caregiver dyads with complete data were used in the canonical analyses. The canonical approach was repeated three times, each occasion using a subset of 16 patient predictors regressed on the entire collection of 14 caregiver variables. The first two canonical analyses, using five quality of life scores, symptoms distress, and six mood distress scores, produced insignificant results. However, the final canonical analysis, using four factors measuring self-care self-efficacy did show significance (Chi-square=81.69, df=60, p=.03). The canonical correlation was .73 (R2 =.54). The largest standardized weights within each set of variables were used to define the pattern linking important patient and caregiver attributes. Themes of these linkages will be discussed. Findings and Implications: Pearlin and colleagues had suggested that caregivers’ coping and social support mediate caregivers’ stress. Results of this study suggest that patients’ self-efficacy may be a mediator of caregivers’ stress. Because of a relatively small number of dyads and a large number of variables, the canonical results should be treated as tentative. Health care professionals need to include caregivers in their delivery of patient care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:15Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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