Utilization Of The Breast Cancer Anxiety Scale In Women At High Risk For Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164858
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Utilization Of The Breast Cancer Anxiety Scale In Women At High Risk For Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Gross, Randolph
Author Details:
Randolph Gross, MS/MSc, Clinical Nurse, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: glamorkit@aol.com
Abstract:
Being at high risk for the development of breast cancer causes a tremendous amount of persistent anxiety. This anxiety is intensified by the lack of concrete and definitive answers regarding risk factors and no consensus on treatment options for high-risk women. This anxiety is unlike a diagnosis of breast cancer, which is perceived as a crisis with the possibility of resolution through current treatment modalities. For high-risk women, this persistent anxiety requires intervention through education and social support. The purpose of this project was to utilize a convenience sample of high-risk women attending a comprehensive surveillance program at our NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center to identify specific factors that contribute to the anxiety. In addition, the interventions the healthcare professionals who work with these women could initiate to mediate those concerns were of interest. The Breast Cancer Anxiety Scale (BCAS) developed by Kathryn Kash is a 21-item tool with a Likert Scale ranging from 0 to 3 for each item. The 21 statements all relate to the emotional and cognitive aspects about breast cancer anxiety within the past 30 days. The scores can range from 0 to 63 with the higher score indicating greater anxiety. One hundred and two women completed the BCAS with a mean score of 22.24 indicating anxiety existed within the sample. Age was significantly inversely correlated with the BCAS scores (r= -0.229, p= .05) suggesting that the younger women in the sample were more anxious than older ones. Also, the BCAS scores were significantly inversely correlated with their 5 year risk scores calculated from the Gail Model (r= -0.230, p= .05) suggesting that the higher the risk, the less the anxiety, perhaps a result of such coping mechanisms as denial or suppression. Furthermore, the practice of breast self-examination (BSE) was also inversely correlated with the BCAS scores (r= -0.215, p= .05) suggesting that the practice of BSE helps to mediate the anxiety these women experience. This presentation will describe the variables examined in relation to the anxiety high risk women experience, discuss the potential predictors, outline the clinical implications of the study results, and identify future directions for nursing research.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUtilization Of The Breast Cancer Anxiety Scale In Women At High Risk For Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorGross, Randolphen_US
dc.author.detailsRandolph Gross, MS/MSc, Clinical Nurse, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: glamorkit@aol.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164858-
dc.description.abstractBeing at high risk for the development of breast cancer causes a tremendous amount of persistent anxiety. This anxiety is intensified by the lack of concrete and definitive answers regarding risk factors and no consensus on treatment options for high-risk women. This anxiety is unlike a diagnosis of breast cancer, which is perceived as a crisis with the possibility of resolution through current treatment modalities. For high-risk women, this persistent anxiety requires intervention through education and social support. The purpose of this project was to utilize a convenience sample of high-risk women attending a comprehensive surveillance program at our NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center to identify specific factors that contribute to the anxiety. In addition, the interventions the healthcare professionals who work with these women could initiate to mediate those concerns were of interest. The Breast Cancer Anxiety Scale (BCAS) developed by Kathryn Kash is a 21-item tool with a Likert Scale ranging from 0 to 3 for each item. The 21 statements all relate to the emotional and cognitive aspects about breast cancer anxiety within the past 30 days. The scores can range from 0 to 63 with the higher score indicating greater anxiety. One hundred and two women completed the BCAS with a mean score of 22.24 indicating anxiety existed within the sample. Age was significantly inversely correlated with the BCAS scores (r= -0.229, p= .05) suggesting that the younger women in the sample were more anxious than older ones. Also, the BCAS scores were significantly inversely correlated with their 5 year risk scores calculated from the Gail Model (r= -0.230, p= .05) suggesting that the higher the risk, the less the anxiety, perhaps a result of such coping mechanisms as denial or suppression. Furthermore, the practice of breast self-examination (BSE) was also inversely correlated with the BCAS scores (r= -0.215, p= .05) suggesting that the practice of BSE helps to mediate the anxiety these women experience. This presentation will describe the variables examined in relation to the anxiety high risk women experience, discuss the potential predictors, outline the clinical implications of the study results, and identify future directions for nursing research.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:16Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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