2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164859
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Individual Differences In The Experience Of Acute Oral Pain
Author(s):
McGuire, D.
Author Details:
D. McGuire, Emory University, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Abstract:
Problem and significance: Acute oral pain secondary to mucositis caused by high dose chemotherapy conditioning regimens for transplantation is a challenging clinical problem. Studies using group means derived from repeated measures show that pain develops, peaks, and resolves over a period of about 5-11 days post transplant. These data, however, yield little information about individual differences in pain. Anecdotal evidence suggests that patients do have different trajectories of pain, which may have important ramifications for prophylaxis, assessment, and treatment of pain. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to use growth curve analysis to: 1) identify individual trajectories of pain over time and cluster them into groups of individuals showing similar patterns of pain; 2) explore relationships between these empirically derived patterns of pain and selected demographic/clinical characteristics; and 3) use individual growth curve analyses to correlate individual growth parameters (e.g., slope, intercept) with selected demographic/clinical characteristics. Conceptual framework: The conceptual framework viewed pain as a subjective experience with physiologic, sensory, affective, cognitive, behavioral, and socio-cultural dimensions, and guided identification of variables and selection of instruments. Methods: This study was a secondary analysis of data from 153 cancer patients receiving high dose chemotherapy in preparation for transplantation who participated in a randomized clinical trial. Instruments included a Patient Data Form (PDF), administered at baseline, and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and 20 item Oral Mucositis Index (OMI), both reliable and valid instruments in the transplant population, administered at baseline then every 3 days following completion of conditioning until 21 days after transplant or discharge. Only patients who reported pain at any data collection timepoint and did not have missing data were retained for the analysis, yielding a final sample size of 62. Data analysis: Traditional repeated measures analyses were used for pain and mucositis data, and individual patient data were plotted over time. Individual growth curve analysis was conducted on pain data by estimating curve parameters (intercept, slope, quadratic term) for each patient. The curves were hierarchically clustered into relatively homogeneous groups and correlated with selected demographic/clinical variables. Growth curve parameters were correlated with each other and other variables. Findings and implications: Traditional analyses demonstrated the expected pattern of developing, peak, and resolving pain, and individual plots had no discernable patterns. Individual growth curve analysis yielded four patterns of pain, characterized as traditional, mild, late, and uncontrolled, which were not significantly correlated with selected demographic/clinical variables. Individual growth curve parameters, however, were significantly (p<0.01) related to severity of mucositis, interference of pain with mood and use of pain medications. Nurses can use these results to better understand, predict, assess, monitor, and treat patients' post-transplant patterns of pain.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIndividual Differences In The Experience Of Acute Oral Painen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, D.en_US
dc.author.detailsD. McGuire, Emory University, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164859-
dc.description.abstractProblem and significance: Acute oral pain secondary to mucositis caused by high dose chemotherapy conditioning regimens for transplantation is a challenging clinical problem. Studies using group means derived from repeated measures show that pain develops, peaks, and resolves over a period of about 5-11 days post transplant. These data, however, yield little information about individual differences in pain. Anecdotal evidence suggests that patients do have different trajectories of pain, which may have important ramifications for prophylaxis, assessment, and treatment of pain. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to use growth curve analysis to: 1) identify individual trajectories of pain over time and cluster them into groups of individuals showing similar patterns of pain; 2) explore relationships between these empirically derived patterns of pain and selected demographic/clinical characteristics; and 3) use individual growth curve analyses to correlate individual growth parameters (e.g., slope, intercept) with selected demographic/clinical characteristics. Conceptual framework: The conceptual framework viewed pain as a subjective experience with physiologic, sensory, affective, cognitive, behavioral, and socio-cultural dimensions, and guided identification of variables and selection of instruments. Methods: This study was a secondary analysis of data from 153 cancer patients receiving high dose chemotherapy in preparation for transplantation who participated in a randomized clinical trial. Instruments included a Patient Data Form (PDF), administered at baseline, and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and 20 item Oral Mucositis Index (OMI), both reliable and valid instruments in the transplant population, administered at baseline then every 3 days following completion of conditioning until 21 days after transplant or discharge. Only patients who reported pain at any data collection timepoint and did not have missing data were retained for the analysis, yielding a final sample size of 62. Data analysis: Traditional repeated measures analyses were used for pain and mucositis data, and individual patient data were plotted over time. Individual growth curve analysis was conducted on pain data by estimating curve parameters (intercept, slope, quadratic term) for each patient. The curves were hierarchically clustered into relatively homogeneous groups and correlated with selected demographic/clinical variables. Growth curve parameters were correlated with each other and other variables. Findings and implications: Traditional analyses demonstrated the expected pattern of developing, peak, and resolving pain, and individual plots had no discernable patterns. Individual growth curve analysis yielded four patterns of pain, characterized as traditional, mild, late, and uncontrolled, which were not significantly correlated with selected demographic/clinical variables. Individual growth curve parameters, however, were significantly (p&lt;0.01) related to severity of mucositis, interference of pain with mood and use of pain medications. Nurses can use these results to better understand, predict, assess, monitor, and treat patients' post-transplant patterns of pain.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:17Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.