Healing Touch and Reiki: Independent Nursing Functions to Support Cancer Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164862
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Healing Touch and Reiki: Independent Nursing Functions to Support Cancer Patients
Author(s):
Teague, Cynthia
Author Details:
Cynthia Teague, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
Touch therapies have been used for centuries to relax patients and promote healing. Therapeutic touch, from which many aspects of Healing Touch are derived, was formally introduced into nursing in the early 70's by Delores Kreiger. She developed a research base, and taught nurses to use therapeutic touch to balance the body's energy field and restore harmony, allowing the patient to heal. Reiki (ray-kee) is an ancient Japanese form of energy healing with the primary purpose of restoring the balance in the body to promote the individual's ability to heal. Both of these techniques are considered forms of energy healing. Theoretical work in energy healing was pioneered in nursing by Martha Rogers who described the body as an energy field in interaction with other energy fields and the global energy field. Although these therapies are ancient, the research base for them is still in its infancy. Benor (1993) reviewed 155 studies on energy healing and concluded that energy healing can be an effective treatment, especially for immune compromised conditions. Healing touch has traditionally been a primarily nurse-initiated intervention and Reiki is becoming almost as popular among nurses who espouse energy healing. These therapies have been used with patients of all ages, including children, with a minimum effect of calming the patients, decreasing pulse rate, and increasing skin temperature. The stress reduction effect has obvious implications for cancer patients who experience stress-provoking events from diagnosis through the treatment and outcomes period. Of these therapies, healing touch and Reiki have the greatest potential as noninvasive techniques to be used on a regular basis by the clinical nurses as they provide daily care to the patient. This presentation will include an overview of Reiki and Healing Touch including the underlying tenets, available research to support its use, the techniques involved, and future directions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealing Touch and Reiki: Independent Nursing Functions to Support Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTeague, Cynthiaen_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Teague, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164862-
dc.description.abstractTouch therapies have been used for centuries to relax patients and promote healing. Therapeutic touch, from which many aspects of Healing Touch are derived, was formally introduced into nursing in the early 70's by Delores Kreiger. She developed a research base, and taught nurses to use therapeutic touch to balance the body's energy field and restore harmony, allowing the patient to heal. Reiki (ray-kee) is an ancient Japanese form of energy healing with the primary purpose of restoring the balance in the body to promote the individual's ability to heal. Both of these techniques are considered forms of energy healing. Theoretical work in energy healing was pioneered in nursing by Martha Rogers who described the body as an energy field in interaction with other energy fields and the global energy field. Although these therapies are ancient, the research base for them is still in its infancy. Benor (1993) reviewed 155 studies on energy healing and concluded that energy healing can be an effective treatment, especially for immune compromised conditions. Healing touch has traditionally been a primarily nurse-initiated intervention and Reiki is becoming almost as popular among nurses who espouse energy healing. These therapies have been used with patients of all ages, including children, with a minimum effect of calming the patients, decreasing pulse rate, and increasing skin temperature. The stress reduction effect has obvious implications for cancer patients who experience stress-provoking events from diagnosis through the treatment and outcomes period. Of these therapies, healing touch and Reiki have the greatest potential as noninvasive techniques to be used on a regular basis by the clinical nurses as they provide daily care to the patient. This presentation will include an overview of Reiki and Healing Touch including the underlying tenets, available research to support its use, the techniques involved, and future directions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:20Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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