2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164867
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Efficacy of a Representational Intervention for Cancer Pain
Author(s):
Ward, Sandra
Author Details:
Sandra Ward, Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Nursing, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test an educational intervention to improve pain management. The hypotheses were: (1) The intervention will decrease beliefs that are barriers to pain management, decrease pain severity, and improve QOL, and (2) Changes in beliefs (barriers) will mediate the effect of the intervention on pain severity and QOL. Theoretical Framework: Leventhal's Common Sense Model, a theory explicating the role of cognitive representations in coping with health problems, guided development of the representational approach to patient education, which, in turn, guided development of a specific educational intervention-a Representational Intervention to Decrease Cancer Pain (RIDcancerPain). Design: Randomized two-group design (RIDcancerPain versus Standard Education [SE]). Valid, reliable measures of barriers, pain severity, and QOL were used at baseline (T1), one month later (T2), and two months later (T3). Sample: Patients with advanced cancer, 18 years or older, who had pain in the past week were eligible to participate. Two hundred twenty two subjects were recruited; 150 completed the study. Findings: Hypotheses were partially supported. There was no main effect for group on T1 to T2 changes in outcome variables. However, there was a group effect on change in barriers from T1 to T3; those in the RIDcancerPain condition showed a greater decrease compared to those in SE [t(124) = 2.04, p = .02]. In addition, there was a group effect on T1 to T3 change in pain severity, with those in the RIDcancerPain condition improving compared to those in SE [t(136) = 2.35, p = .02]. The change in barriers from T1 to T3 mediated the effect of the intervention on the change in pain severity from T1 to T3. There was no main effect of group on T1 to T3 change in overall QOL. Conclusions: The representational approach to patient education shows promise in that RIDcancerPain had a positive effect on some but not all outcomes. Implications: Further testing of a strengthened version of RIDcancerPain should be done, and the representational approach to education needs to be tested in other health problems. Clinicians could consider systematic interventions to overcome patient-related barriers to pain management.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of a Representational Intervention for Cancer Painen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWard, Sandraen_US
dc.author.detailsSandra Ward, Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Nursing, Madison, Wisconsin, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164867-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to test an educational intervention to improve pain management. The hypotheses were: (1) The intervention will decrease beliefs that are barriers to pain management, decrease pain severity, and improve QOL, and (2) Changes in beliefs (barriers) will mediate the effect of the intervention on pain severity and QOL. Theoretical Framework: Leventhal's Common Sense Model, a theory explicating the role of cognitive representations in coping with health problems, guided development of the representational approach to patient education, which, in turn, guided development of a specific educational intervention-a Representational Intervention to Decrease Cancer Pain (RIDcancerPain). Design: Randomized two-group design (RIDcancerPain versus Standard Education [SE]). Valid, reliable measures of barriers, pain severity, and QOL were used at baseline (T1), one month later (T2), and two months later (T3). Sample: Patients with advanced cancer, 18 years or older, who had pain in the past week were eligible to participate. Two hundred twenty two subjects were recruited; 150 completed the study. Findings: Hypotheses were partially supported. There was no main effect for group on T1 to T2 changes in outcome variables. However, there was a group effect on change in barriers from T1 to T3; those in the RIDcancerPain condition showed a greater decrease compared to those in SE [t(124) = 2.04, p = .02]. In addition, there was a group effect on T1 to T3 change in pain severity, with those in the RIDcancerPain condition improving compared to those in SE [t(136) = 2.35, p = .02]. The change in barriers from T1 to T3 mediated the effect of the intervention on the change in pain severity from T1 to T3. There was no main effect of group on T1 to T3 change in overall QOL. Conclusions: The representational approach to patient education shows promise in that RIDcancerPain had a positive effect on some but not all outcomes. Implications: Further testing of a strengthened version of RIDcancerPain should be done, and the representational approach to education needs to be tested in other health problems. Clinicians could consider systematic interventions to overcome patient-related barriers to pain management.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:25Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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