2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164868
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cancer-Related Fatigue: "It's So Much More Than Just Being Tired."
Author(s):
Wu, Horng-Shiuann
Author Details:
Horng-Shiuann Wu, Graduate Assistant, Saint Louis University, School of Nursing, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, email: wuh@slu.edu
Abstract:
Fatigue is highly prevalent among persons with cancer and has great impact on their lives, but the subjective experience of cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is not well understood. Because CRF is a subjective, multidimensional experience, developing a knowledge base about and effective interventions for CRF require understanding the phenomenon from the individual's perspective. Purpose/Objectives: This study explored the meaning of CRF from the person's perspective to learn about the actual experience of fatigue. Scientific Framework: A phenomenological perspective served as the philosophical framework of this study. Human behaviors were understood from the individual's own context; CRF was interpreted through the meanings individual brought to it. Design: Qualitative methods were used to understand the individual's experience of CRF. Sample: The sample consisted of 10 female patients with breast cancer currently receiving chemotherapy from a freestanding clinic in St. Louis, Missouri. Two African American and eight Caucasian women, aged 30 to 73 years, with various cancer stages, participated. Criterion sampling was used. Methods: After giving informed consent, the subjects participated in audiotaped, semi-structured, 30-60 minute individual interviews (n = 10) and a two-week daily fatigue diary activity (n = 6 returned). Data Analysis: Content analysis, using open and axial coding and coding frames, guided the coding and analysis in this study. Findings: The analysis resulted in the following thematic categories: unique fatigue, physical sensations, emotional sensations, changes in daily life, causes of fatigue, fatigue management, fatigue trajectory, and reflection/meanings. Conclusions: CRF as a multidimensional phenomenon that affects all aspects of an individual's life is evidenced. Participants described that they were experiencing an unexpected degree and kind of fatigue that is much more than just being tired. Lack of awareness and knowledge to confront CRF were identified across interviews. Individualized strategies were learned from the person's own experiences. Implications: The findings will help cancer patients and clinicians better understand CRF from a holistic approach. They may prompt the development of interventions to help chemotherapy patients anticipate and respond to CRF. A CRF instrument is in development based on the findings of this study.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCancer-Related Fatigue: "It's So Much More Than Just Being Tired."en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWu, Horng-Shiuannen_US
dc.author.detailsHorng-Shiuann Wu, Graduate Assistant, Saint Louis University, School of Nursing, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, email: wuh@slu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164868-
dc.description.abstractFatigue is highly prevalent among persons with cancer and has great impact on their lives, but the subjective experience of cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is not well understood. Because CRF is a subjective, multidimensional experience, developing a knowledge base about and effective interventions for CRF require understanding the phenomenon from the individual's perspective. Purpose/Objectives: This study explored the meaning of CRF from the person's perspective to learn about the actual experience of fatigue. Scientific Framework: A phenomenological perspective served as the philosophical framework of this study. Human behaviors were understood from the individual's own context; CRF was interpreted through the meanings individual brought to it. Design: Qualitative methods were used to understand the individual's experience of CRF. Sample: The sample consisted of 10 female patients with breast cancer currently receiving chemotherapy from a freestanding clinic in St. Louis, Missouri. Two African American and eight Caucasian women, aged 30 to 73 years, with various cancer stages, participated. Criterion sampling was used. Methods: After giving informed consent, the subjects participated in audiotaped, semi-structured, 30-60 minute individual interviews (n = 10) and a two-week daily fatigue diary activity (n = 6 returned). Data Analysis: Content analysis, using open and axial coding and coding frames, guided the coding and analysis in this study. Findings: The analysis resulted in the following thematic categories: unique fatigue, physical sensations, emotional sensations, changes in daily life, causes of fatigue, fatigue management, fatigue trajectory, and reflection/meanings. Conclusions: CRF as a multidimensional phenomenon that affects all aspects of an individual's life is evidenced. Participants described that they were experiencing an unexpected degree and kind of fatigue that is much more than just being tired. Lack of awareness and knowledge to confront CRF were identified across interviews. Individualized strategies were learned from the person's own experiences. Implications: The findings will help cancer patients and clinicians better understand CRF from a holistic approach. They may prompt the development of interventions to help chemotherapy patients anticipate and respond to CRF. A CRF instrument is in development based on the findings of this study.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:26Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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