Novel Ideas for Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment: The Concept of cDNA Microanalysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164870
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Novel Ideas for Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment: The Concept of cDNA Microanalysis
Author(s):
Berman, Arlene
Author Details:
Arlene Berman, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
Abstract:
In 2001, approximately 192,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 40,600 women will die from the disease. Until now, we have relied upon histologic classification and the testing of a few prognostic markers by pathologists as our way of classifying tumors. The majority of oncology nurses are familiar with the prognostic indicators of tumor size, lymph node status, estrogen and progesterone receptors, and, more recently, HER2 status. What is not clearly understood is why two breast cancer patients, with identical prognostic indicators, can get the same chemotherapy or hormonal treatments, and yet have different outcomes. Complementary DNA micro array is a powerful new technology that allows the simultaneous measurement of the expression of a large number of genes and has the potential for tumor characterization, and may make it possible to predict patient response to therapy. The application of a large number of genes in a condensed array on glass slides comprises a DNA micro array. Genetic material from normal and tumor tissues is extracted, transcribed into cDNA, and labeled with fluorescent dye. The fluorescent color that results from the cDNA binding to the slide can tell us whether a set of genes are over expressed or under expressed compared to a reference standard. This information may help us identify gene patterns that predict for tumor response or drug resistance. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute are using this technology in a phase II neoadjuvant trial of women with stage II and III breast cancer. With this population, we are able to obtain tumor tissue before and during chemotherapy and apply this technology to look for patterns of gene expression. This technology may reveal to us hidden relationships that go beyond the pathological appearance of a tumor. Oncology nurses need to have a working knowledge of available technology for breast cancer in order to assist patients in understanding potential treatment options. Our hope is that in the future we will be able to apply this technology to tailor therapy to an individual's tumor abnormality and therefore improve patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNovel Ideas for Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment: The Concept of cDNA Microanalysisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBerman, Arleneen_US
dc.author.detailsArlene Berman, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164870-
dc.description.abstractIn 2001, approximately 192,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 40,600 women will die from the disease. Until now, we have relied upon histologic classification and the testing of a few prognostic markers by pathologists as our way of classifying tumors. The majority of oncology nurses are familiar with the prognostic indicators of tumor size, lymph node status, estrogen and progesterone receptors, and, more recently, HER2 status. What is not clearly understood is why two breast cancer patients, with identical prognostic indicators, can get the same chemotherapy or hormonal treatments, and yet have different outcomes. Complementary DNA micro array is a powerful new technology that allows the simultaneous measurement of the expression of a large number of genes and has the potential for tumor characterization, and may make it possible to predict patient response to therapy. The application of a large number of genes in a condensed array on glass slides comprises a DNA micro array. Genetic material from normal and tumor tissues is extracted, transcribed into cDNA, and labeled with fluorescent dye. The fluorescent color that results from the cDNA binding to the slide can tell us whether a set of genes are over expressed or under expressed compared to a reference standard. This information may help us identify gene patterns that predict for tumor response or drug resistance. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute are using this technology in a phase II neoadjuvant trial of women with stage II and III breast cancer. With this population, we are able to obtain tumor tissue before and during chemotherapy and apply this technology to look for patterns of gene expression. This technology may reveal to us hidden relationships that go beyond the pathological appearance of a tumor. Oncology nurses need to have a working knowledge of available technology for breast cancer in order to assist patients in understanding potential treatment options. Our hope is that in the future we will be able to apply this technology to tailor therapy to an individual's tumor abnormality and therefore improve patient outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:28Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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