A Foot in Two Worlds: Nurses' Personal and Professional Experiences of Cancer Survivorship

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164871
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Foot in Two Worlds: Nurses' Personal and Professional Experiences of Cancer Survivorship
Author(s):
Picard, Carol
Author Details:
Carol Picard, PhD, Associate Director, Graduate Program in Nursing, MGH Institute of Health Profession, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: cpicard@partners.org
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of cancer survivorship for nurses. The theoretical and scientific framework of the study design was based on the caring theory of Jean Watson and Margaret Newman. Newman's method of cooperative inquiry was used for the study. This narrative form of inquiry was recognized for its value by allowing for the co-construction of illness narratives with participants while employing the elements of empathic listening, reflection, and interpretation on the part of the researchers. Two audiotaped interviews were conducted. In the first interview, the participants were asked what it is like to be a cancer survivor and how the whole experience influenced them personally and professionally. In the second interview, the researchers shared their understanding of the story through a construal of the text, identifying key themes or statements using the participants' own words. The researchers also shared their appreciation of the story through a piece of art which captured their understanding of the essence of the story. Secondary analysis examined all participants' stories for common and unique themes. Participants were registered nurses who had been diagnosed and treated for cancer. A sample of twenty-five participants was recruited through postings in nursing publications and in two major cancer treatment centers in the Northeast. Preliminary results indicate that nurses 1) valued highly the need to be fully informed to make their decisions through their own knowledge-based experience, 2) identified the need for attentive listening and compassion in their own treatment, 3) valued person-centered care as a critical element in managing the diagnostic and treatment process, or suffered with the burden of diagnosis and treatment in its absence, and 4) deepened their level of compassion and advocacy for patients in giving direct care as a result of their own illness. The implications of the study are that the perspective of the nurse cancer survivor can inform healthcare colleagues and the public about the nature of patient/provider relationships. The presentation will provide information related to unique needs of this specific population which, to date, were not explored.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Foot in Two Worlds: Nurses' Personal and Professional Experiences of Cancer Survivorshipen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPicard, Carolen_US
dc.author.detailsCarol Picard, PhD, Associate Director, Graduate Program in Nursing, MGH Institute of Health Profession, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: cpicard@partners.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164871-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to explore the experience of cancer survivorship for nurses. The theoretical and scientific framework of the study design was based on the caring theory of Jean Watson and Margaret Newman. Newman's method of cooperative inquiry was used for the study. This narrative form of inquiry was recognized for its value by allowing for the co-construction of illness narratives with participants while employing the elements of empathic listening, reflection, and interpretation on the part of the researchers. Two audiotaped interviews were conducted. In the first interview, the participants were asked what it is like to be a cancer survivor and how the whole experience influenced them personally and professionally. In the second interview, the researchers shared their understanding of the story through a construal of the text, identifying key themes or statements using the participants' own words. The researchers also shared their appreciation of the story through a piece of art which captured their understanding of the essence of the story. Secondary analysis examined all participants' stories for common and unique themes. Participants were registered nurses who had been diagnosed and treated for cancer. A sample of twenty-five participants was recruited through postings in nursing publications and in two major cancer treatment centers in the Northeast. Preliminary results indicate that nurses 1) valued highly the need to be fully informed to make their decisions through their own knowledge-based experience, 2) identified the need for attentive listening and compassion in their own treatment, 3) valued person-centered care as a critical element in managing the diagnostic and treatment process, or suffered with the burden of diagnosis and treatment in its absence, and 4) deepened their level of compassion and advocacy for patients in giving direct care as a result of their own illness. The implications of the study are that the perspective of the nurse cancer survivor can inform healthcare colleagues and the public about the nature of patient/provider relationships. The presentation will provide information related to unique needs of this specific population which, to date, were not explored.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:29Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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