Gliomas: A Cancer for All Ages-Incidence, Etiology, Current Treatment, and Innovations in Research

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164874
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gliomas: A Cancer for All Ages-Incidence, Etiology, Current Treatment, and Innovations in Research
Author(s):
Green, Lisa
Author Details:
Lisa Green, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
Malignant gliomas are the most prevalent primary brain tumors and account for more than 50% of all primary CNS cancers. Over the last decade, the incidence of intracranial tumors has been increasing at an alarming rate. The cause of most brain tumors remains unknown. However, factors associated with the risk of developing tumors continue to emerge. Some associations with genetic diseases have been observed and multiple environmental factors continue to be investigated. The glioma class of tumors includes astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, and mixed gliomas. Astrocytomas account for 60% of all primary brain tumors, while oligodendrogliomas represent three to seven percent, and ependymomas, 5%. High-grade gliomas include anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme, representing less than 30% and greater than 50% of gliomas, respectively. Treatment for gliomas includes surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, biotherapy (with limited success, but renewed interest), and the addition of supportive care treatments such as anticonvulsants and corticosteroids. In children, total gross resection (greater than 90%) of the tumor in newly diagnosed patients followed by radiation and chemotherapy has been the most powerful predictor of outcome. Clinical manifestations, treatment, complications, and supportive care requirements vary with the location and the histology of the tumor. Therefore, these patients require highly individualized plans of care and tend to present great challenges to the healthcare team and caregiver. Since outcomes vary from cure, to permanent disability, or a very short life expectancy, patients and families rely on nurses for education, care, and support. New diagnostic techniques and therapy regimens are being proposed on a regular basis in an attempt to improve the therapeutic outcomes for these patients. Included in these regimens are Temodar, Thalidomide, Tamoxifen, and gene therapy. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the incidence and etiology of gliomas plus discussion of current treatments and innovative efforts in clinical research with regard to diagnosis and treatment. Emphasis will be placed on patient and family psychosocial needs and nursing care for this complex cancer group.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGliomas: A Cancer for All Ages-Incidence, Etiology, Current Treatment, and Innovations in Researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Lisaen_US
dc.author.detailsLisa Green, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164874-
dc.description.abstractMalignant gliomas are the most prevalent primary brain tumors and account for more than 50% of all primary CNS cancers. Over the last decade, the incidence of intracranial tumors has been increasing at an alarming rate. The cause of most brain tumors remains unknown. However, factors associated with the risk of developing tumors continue to emerge. Some associations with genetic diseases have been observed and multiple environmental factors continue to be investigated. The glioma class of tumors includes astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, and mixed gliomas. Astrocytomas account for 60% of all primary brain tumors, while oligodendrogliomas represent three to seven percent, and ependymomas, 5%. High-grade gliomas include anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme, representing less than 30% and greater than 50% of gliomas, respectively. Treatment for gliomas includes surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, biotherapy (with limited success, but renewed interest), and the addition of supportive care treatments such as anticonvulsants and corticosteroids. In children, total gross resection (greater than 90%) of the tumor in newly diagnosed patients followed by radiation and chemotherapy has been the most powerful predictor of outcome. Clinical manifestations, treatment, complications, and supportive care requirements vary with the location and the histology of the tumor. Therefore, these patients require highly individualized plans of care and tend to present great challenges to the healthcare team and caregiver. Since outcomes vary from cure, to permanent disability, or a very short life expectancy, patients and families rely on nurses for education, care, and support. New diagnostic techniques and therapy regimens are being proposed on a regular basis in an attempt to improve the therapeutic outcomes for these patients. Included in these regimens are Temodar, Thalidomide, Tamoxifen, and gene therapy. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the incidence and etiology of gliomas plus discussion of current treatments and innovative efforts in clinical research with regard to diagnosis and treatment. Emphasis will be placed on patient and family psychosocial needs and nursing care for this complex cancer group.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:32Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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