2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164875
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Tubes, Drains, and Management Pains
Author(s):
Gerlach, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Gerlach, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan, USA
Abstract:
Throughout the course of their disease, oncology patients may require a variety of tubes or drains. Once, only a few patients needed multiple tubes. Today, with increased aggressive therapeutic modalities, it has become increasingly common for oncology patients to have two or more tubes at any one time. Today, about 100,000 percutaneous, endoscopic tubes (PEG) are performed annually in the United States. Of all diagnoses, cancer is the second most common indication for placing a feeding tube. While increased use of tubes and drains has contributed to enhancing both the length and quality of life for many cancer patients, improper tube management may cause major distress. Frequently these tubes may malfunction or be managed incorrectly resulting in patient suffering and distress. Tubes commonly used in the oncology population include feeding tubes (gastrostomy or jejunostomy), decompression tubes, and various types of drains and biliary catheters. Complications that can occur from improper tube management include peritubular leakage, tube migration, and impaired skin integrity including candidiasis and skin erosion. Nurses caring for patients with tubes and drains must possess the necessary knowledge and skill to effectively manage these devices. The purpose of this poster is to describe correct site care for the patient with a tube or drain, the importance of tube stabilization techniques, interventions to prevent tube or drain complications, management of tube complications, and the necessity of patient education for tube and drain care. This poster also will present an algorithm for proper tube and drain care and management of common complications.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTubes, Drains, and Management Painsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGerlach, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Gerlach, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164875-
dc.description.abstractThroughout the course of their disease, oncology patients may require a variety of tubes or drains. Once, only a few patients needed multiple tubes. Today, with increased aggressive therapeutic modalities, it has become increasingly common for oncology patients to have two or more tubes at any one time. Today, about 100,000 percutaneous, endoscopic tubes (PEG) are performed annually in the United States. Of all diagnoses, cancer is the second most common indication for placing a feeding tube. While increased use of tubes and drains has contributed to enhancing both the length and quality of life for many cancer patients, improper tube management may cause major distress. Frequently these tubes may malfunction or be managed incorrectly resulting in patient suffering and distress. Tubes commonly used in the oncology population include feeding tubes (gastrostomy or jejunostomy), decompression tubes, and various types of drains and biliary catheters. Complications that can occur from improper tube management include peritubular leakage, tube migration, and impaired skin integrity including candidiasis and skin erosion. Nurses caring for patients with tubes and drains must possess the necessary knowledge and skill to effectively manage these devices. The purpose of this poster is to describe correct site care for the patient with a tube or drain, the importance of tube stabilization techniques, interventions to prevent tube or drain complications, management of tube complications, and the necessity of patient education for tube and drain care. This poster also will present an algorithm for proper tube and drain care and management of common complications.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:33Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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