AN EVIDENCE-BASED APPROACH TO REDUCING NIGHTTIME NOISE ON ONCOLOGY INPATIENT UNITS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164879
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
AN EVIDENCE-BASED APPROACH TO REDUCING NIGHTTIME NOISE ON ONCOLOGY INPATIENT UNITS
Author(s):
Stanghellini, Escel; Carnie, Martie; Gadkari, Mrinalini; Mahan, Nancy; Benedict, Catherine; Leon, Christine
Author Details:
Escel Stanghellini, MSN BSN RN, Program Manager for Quality & Education, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: estanghellini@partners.org; Martie Carnie, AS, Patient and Family Advisory Council, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Womens Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Mrinalini Gadkari, MPHSA, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Nancy Mahan, RN, OCN; Catherine Benedict, RN, BSN; Christine Leon
Abstract:
Nighttime noise (any sound that patients identify as bothersome or that disturbs their sleep or other activities) is a frequent patient complaint on acute care oncology units despite recommendations on the acceptable noise levels from the United States Environmental Protection Agency. An evidence-based practice (EBP) project was designed by nurses to address this problem on the in-patient units of an NCI-designated Cancer Center located in the North East. The purpose of this project was to develop evidence-based strategies to reduce the nighttime noise levels on the inpatient oncology units. A Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycle was used to analyze patient complaints about noise, develop noise reduction guidelines, and pilot their use on two adult Hematology/Oncology/Bone Marrow Transplant patient units. A masters-prepared oncology nurse led the Inpatient Quality Improvement Team that carried out this EBP project; the team included staff nurses, a health and safety technologist, a quality improvement specialist, and a representative of patients and their families. Evidence were used to develop the guidelines included: benchmarking data, expert opinion, patient/family input, published research and other literature. A learning packet containing the guideline recommendations for noise reduction was distributed to the nursing staff via email and hard copies. In-services were provided to facilitate discussion. Posters and small flyers with reminders to limit noise were posted in the patient care areas. Initial patient satisfaction on noise level after guideline implementation, measured, by the Press-Ganey survey instrument, showed an increase of 1.5% on one pilot unit but a 3% decrease in satisfaction on the other pilot unit. This data will continue to be collected and analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of on going noise reduction efforts. The next step is to track the process measures to gauge compliance and usage of noise reduction guidelines. Nurse clinicians and managers can use the information from this project in two ways: to implement these guidelines for nighttime noise reduction on their patient care unit(s) and to use this model for developing and implementing evidence-based guidelines that address other issues of concern to oncology nurses and their patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAN EVIDENCE-BASED APPROACH TO REDUCING NIGHTTIME NOISE ON ONCOLOGY INPATIENT UNITSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStanghellini, Escelen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarnie, Martieen_US
dc.contributor.authorGadkari, Mrinalinien_US
dc.contributor.authorMahan, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBenedict, Catherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeon, Christineen_US
dc.author.detailsEscel Stanghellini, MSN BSN RN, Program Manager for Quality & Education, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: estanghellini@partners.org; Martie Carnie, AS, Patient and Family Advisory Council, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Womens Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Mrinalini Gadkari, MPHSA, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Nancy Mahan, RN, OCN; Catherine Benedict, RN, BSN; Christine Leonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164879-
dc.description.abstractNighttime noise (any sound that patients identify as bothersome or that disturbs their sleep or other activities) is a frequent patient complaint on acute care oncology units despite recommendations on the acceptable noise levels from the United States Environmental Protection Agency. An evidence-based practice (EBP) project was designed by nurses to address this problem on the in-patient units of an NCI-designated Cancer Center located in the North East. The purpose of this project was to develop evidence-based strategies to reduce the nighttime noise levels on the inpatient oncology units. A Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycle was used to analyze patient complaints about noise, develop noise reduction guidelines, and pilot their use on two adult Hematology/Oncology/Bone Marrow Transplant patient units. A masters-prepared oncology nurse led the Inpatient Quality Improvement Team that carried out this EBP project; the team included staff nurses, a health and safety technologist, a quality improvement specialist, and a representative of patients and their families. Evidence were used to develop the guidelines included: benchmarking data, expert opinion, patient/family input, published research and other literature. A learning packet containing the guideline recommendations for noise reduction was distributed to the nursing staff via email and hard copies. In-services were provided to facilitate discussion. Posters and small flyers with reminders to limit noise were posted in the patient care areas. Initial patient satisfaction on noise level after guideline implementation, measured, by the Press-Ganey survey instrument, showed an increase of 1.5% on one pilot unit but a 3% decrease in satisfaction on the other pilot unit. This data will continue to be collected and analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of on going noise reduction efforts. The next step is to track the process measures to gauge compliance and usage of noise reduction guidelines. Nurse clinicians and managers can use the information from this project in two ways: to implement these guidelines for nighttime noise reduction on their patient care unit(s) and to use this model for developing and implementing evidence-based guidelines that address other issues of concern to oncology nurses and their patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:37Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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