ONE PRACTITIONER'S EXPERIENCE WITH COUNSELING AND TESTING WOMEN AT RISK FOR HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164886
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ONE PRACTITIONER'S EXPERIENCE WITH COUNSELING AND TESTING WOMEN AT RISK FOR HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME
Author(s):
Tatum, Tracey
Author Details:
Tracey Tatum, RN MS FNP OCN, Breast Cancer Coordinator, Thomas Johns Cancer Center at CJW Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: Tracey.Tatum@HCAHealthcare.com
Abstract:
The Oncology Nursing Society and American Society of Clinical Oncology have identified that genetic testing for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (HBOCS) is not appropriate for screening of the general population, but is an important tool for cancer prevention and early detection in specific groups. Important characteristics that have been identified include: breast cancer < 50 years, bilateral breast cancer, male breast cancer, Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, and ovarian cancer at any age. Therefore, it is important to obtain a thorough medical and family history to identify appropriate candidates. The purpose of this review was to evaluate my practice and the patients that proceeded to genetic testing for HBOCS. This review included: my patientsÆ hereditary characteristics, risk factors of patients tested, testing results, medical management advised and patientÆs medical treatment decisions. A retrospective chart review was conducted to assess patients referred for genetics services, who received pre and post-test counseling and BRACA Analysis testing for HBOCS. Also, outcomes data on patients testing positive for a deleterious BRCA mutation was obtained. Out of the seventy-nine patients evaluated, 15% tested positive for a deleterious mutation. Two or more risk factors for HBOCS were identified in 65% of these patients. Additionally, eighty-four percent of patients had breast cancer before the age of fifty diagnosed in themselves and/or a family member. The overwhelming majority of patients referred to me had a diagnosis of either breast or ovarian cancer and were referred by oncology providers. These test results were utilized to make medical decisions to reduce the risk of recurrence or to prevent new diagnoses in patients and their family members. Optimally, to improve prevention and early detection of hereditary cancer, primary care providers and gynecologists need to be targeted. As the U.S. Surgeon General has advised, a review of all patientsÆ family histories should be obtained. Thus, indicators of risk for HBOCS could be identified. Then, changes to medical plans to reduce risks of HBOCS associated diseases could occur before cancer is diagnosed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleONE PRACTITIONER'S EXPERIENCE WITH COUNSELING AND TESTING WOMEN AT RISK FOR HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROMEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTatum, Traceyen_US
dc.author.detailsTracey Tatum, RN MS FNP OCN, Breast Cancer Coordinator, Thomas Johns Cancer Center at CJW Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: Tracey.Tatum@HCAHealthcare.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164886-
dc.description.abstractThe Oncology Nursing Society and American Society of Clinical Oncology have identified that genetic testing for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (HBOCS) is not appropriate for screening of the general population, but is an important tool for cancer prevention and early detection in specific groups. Important characteristics that have been identified include: breast cancer &lt; 50 years, bilateral breast cancer, male breast cancer, Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, and ovarian cancer at any age. Therefore, it is important to obtain a thorough medical and family history to identify appropriate candidates. The purpose of this review was to evaluate my practice and the patients that proceeded to genetic testing for HBOCS. This review included: my patients&AElig; hereditary characteristics, risk factors of patients tested, testing results, medical management advised and patient&AElig;s medical treatment decisions. A retrospective chart review was conducted to assess patients referred for genetics services, who received pre and post-test counseling and BRACA Analysis testing for HBOCS. Also, outcomes data on patients testing positive for a deleterious BRCA mutation was obtained. Out of the seventy-nine patients evaluated, 15% tested positive for a deleterious mutation. Two or more risk factors for HBOCS were identified in 65% of these patients. Additionally, eighty-four percent of patients had breast cancer before the age of fifty diagnosed in themselves and/or a family member. The overwhelming majority of patients referred to me had a diagnosis of either breast or ovarian cancer and were referred by oncology providers. These test results were utilized to make medical decisions to reduce the risk of recurrence or to prevent new diagnoses in patients and their family members. Optimally, to improve prevention and early detection of hereditary cancer, primary care providers and gynecologists need to be targeted. As the U.S. Surgeon General has advised, a review of all patients&AElig; family histories should be obtained. Thus, indicators of risk for HBOCS could be identified. Then, changes to medical plans to reduce risks of HBOCS associated diseases could occur before cancer is diagnosed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:44Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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