STRESSORS IN ONCOLOGY NURSING: POTENTIAL SOURCES OF ABSENTEEISM AND TURNOVER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164889
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
STRESSORS IN ONCOLOGY NURSING: POTENTIAL SOURCES OF ABSENTEEISM AND TURNOVER
Author(s):
Throckmorton, Terry
Author Details:
Terry Throckmorton, PHD RN, Director, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: tthrockm@mdanderson.org
Abstract:
It is estimated that, by the year 2020, the U.S. will need 2.8 million registered nurses, almost 1 million more than will be available. Older nurses are retiring and enrollment has been down. Retention of skilled nurses is both a safety issue and a financial need for health care institutions. Attention to personal and environmental factors that affect nurses is essential for retention. The purpose of this presentation is to explore sources of stress for oncology including personal and secondary post-traumatic stress syndrome that have previously been overlooked. A review of the literature was conducted to define and link these sources of stress in terms of their effect on nurses in general and oncology nurses in particular using Figley's work on PTSD as a beginning. Explanatory articles and research were explored for supporting evidence and potential approaches to management. Using the criteria from Figley's model and the available research, sources of stressors, symptoms, and potential interventions were identified. Although this concept is relatively new in relation to nurses and their work, there is beginning evidence that nursesÆ personal stressors throughout life and their exposure to patients with the traumatic experience of cancer can dispose them to a type of secondary posttraumatic stress syndrome that is to be differentiated from burnout. Prevention and treatment follow a similar pattern to those for disaster workers and military personnel who are exposed to trauma.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSTRESSORS IN ONCOLOGY NURSING: POTENTIAL SOURCES OF ABSENTEEISM AND TURNOVERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorThrockmorton, Terryen_US
dc.author.detailsTerry Throckmorton, PHD RN, Director, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: tthrockm@mdanderson.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164889-
dc.description.abstractIt is estimated that, by the year 2020, the U.S. will need 2.8 million registered nurses, almost 1 million more than will be available. Older nurses are retiring and enrollment has been down. Retention of skilled nurses is both a safety issue and a financial need for health care institutions. Attention to personal and environmental factors that affect nurses is essential for retention. The purpose of this presentation is to explore sources of stress for oncology including personal and secondary post-traumatic stress syndrome that have previously been overlooked. A review of the literature was conducted to define and link these sources of stress in terms of their effect on nurses in general and oncology nurses in particular using Figley's work on PTSD as a beginning. Explanatory articles and research were explored for supporting evidence and potential approaches to management. Using the criteria from Figley's model and the available research, sources of stressors, symptoms, and potential interventions were identified. Although this concept is relatively new in relation to nurses and their work, there is beginning evidence that nursesÆ personal stressors throughout life and their exposure to patients with the traumatic experience of cancer can dispose them to a type of secondary posttraumatic stress syndrome that is to be differentiated from burnout. Prevention and treatment follow a similar pattern to those for disaster workers and military personnel who are exposed to trauma.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:47Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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