ARE SUBJECTS SATISFIED WITH THE EDUCATION PROVIDED DURING THE INFORMED CONSENT PROCESS? A SURVEY OF RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164890
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ARE SUBJECTS SATISFIED WITH THE EDUCATION PROVIDED DURING THE INFORMED CONSENT PROCESS? A SURVEY OF RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS
Author(s):
Tolbert, Vicki
Author Details:
Vicki Tolbert, RN BSN OCNCCRP, Cancer Research Nurse Coordinator, The Thomas Johns Cancer Center, CJW Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: vicki.tolbert@hcahealthcare.com
Abstract:
Informed consent for participants of clinical trials is ethically and legally required. However, standardized methods for assessing the adequacy of informed consent for research is lacking. Studies show that patients tend to decline participation in clinical trials when they do not understand the information provided to them. Therefore, we need to ensure that we are providing information to our patients at a level that they can easily understand. The purpose of this project was to measure our patientsÆ satisfaction with the education provided to them during the clinical trial enrollment process. Positive satisfaction scores of those enrolled were recognized as measures of success. A questionnaire was developed addressing patient education issues related to enrolling on a clinical trial. In addition, questions were asked about the education provided by specific research staff members and the courtesy of the research staff. The questionnaire was sent to all patients who signed an informed consent over a period of one year. Fifty percent of all questionnaires were returned with 46% of the participants responding with a perfect score. Areas of strength identified were satisfaction with the explanation of the clinical trial process (treatments, schedules, tests). Areas for improvement including providing more information about potential side effects, risks and benefits. The best provider of information on the research team (physicians, research, chemotherapy RNs) was the research nurse. The top factor influencing study participation was how the physician presented the information as a treatment option. The survey identified the need to improve the understandability of the medical terminology utilized in educating the participants. A list of terms and words used in informed consents were reevaluated for definitions at a sixth grade reading level. Also, in order for the patient to have time to make an educated decision, they are given the consent to take home. A follow up phone call is made prior to their return to answer any questions or concerns. We plan to reassess our progress after implementation of our recommendations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleARE SUBJECTS SATISFIED WITH THE EDUCATION PROVIDED DURING THE INFORMED CONSENT PROCESS? A SURVEY OF RESEARCH PARTICIPANTSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTolbert, Vickien_US
dc.author.detailsVicki Tolbert, RN BSN OCNCCRP, Cancer Research Nurse Coordinator, The Thomas Johns Cancer Center, CJW Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: vicki.tolbert@hcahealthcare.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164890-
dc.description.abstractInformed consent for participants of clinical trials is ethically and legally required. However, standardized methods for assessing the adequacy of informed consent for research is lacking. Studies show that patients tend to decline participation in clinical trials when they do not understand the information provided to them. Therefore, we need to ensure that we are providing information to our patients at a level that they can easily understand. The purpose of this project was to measure our patientsÆ satisfaction with the education provided to them during the clinical trial enrollment process. Positive satisfaction scores of those enrolled were recognized as measures of success. A questionnaire was developed addressing patient education issues related to enrolling on a clinical trial. In addition, questions were asked about the education provided by specific research staff members and the courtesy of the research staff. The questionnaire was sent to all patients who signed an informed consent over a period of one year. Fifty percent of all questionnaires were returned with 46% of the participants responding with a perfect score. Areas of strength identified were satisfaction with the explanation of the clinical trial process (treatments, schedules, tests). Areas for improvement including providing more information about potential side effects, risks and benefits. The best provider of information on the research team (physicians, research, chemotherapy RNs) was the research nurse. The top factor influencing study participation was how the physician presented the information as a treatment option. The survey identified the need to improve the understandability of the medical terminology utilized in educating the participants. A list of terms and words used in informed consents were reevaluated for definitions at a sixth grade reading level. Also, in order for the patient to have time to make an educated decision, they are given the consent to take home. A follow up phone call is made prior to their return to answer any questions or concerns. We plan to reassess our progress after implementation of our recommendations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:48Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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