2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164891
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
INCREASING HAND HYGIENE COMPLIANCE REQUIRES CULTURE CHANGE
Author(s):
Treon, Michelle; Kelley, Kristen; Patricia Kneebone, Patricia
Author Details:
Michelle Treon, MSN RN OCN, Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist, Clarian Health Partners, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: mtreon@clarian.org; Kristen Kelley, MPH; Patricia Kneebone, BSN, RN, OCN, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana; Regina Miles, BSN, RN, OCN
Abstract:
An estimated 90,000 deaths occur yearly from hospital-acquired infections. Transmission of pathogens often occurs via contaminated hands. Hand hygiene is a simple and effective intervention to reduce the spread of infection. Despite this common knowledge, providers disregard this intervention. Compliance by providers with recommended hand hygiene procedures has remained unacceptable. One type of hospital-acquired infection is a central venous catheter (CVC) infection. Reduction by 90% would save 225,000 patients from experiencing this complication, and $5.63 billion dollars saved nationally. To design an innovative educational intervention to increase awareness of infection control practices, and increase hand hygiene compliance. Interventions targeted multidisciplinary providers on the adult Hematology/Oncology unit. The project was lead by the Clinical Nurse Specialist, Infection Control Practitioner, and Outcome Specialist with participation from the unit staff and Unit Manager. A Likert survey was created for staff to determine degree of compliance aligning with knowledge of infection control. Survey questions were written to elicit honest answers and evoke a self-assessment. Second, an interactive hand culturing experiment occurred. Anonymous volunteers performed hand hygiene, touched common unit surfaces, and placed their hands on blood agar plates. Photographs of the cultures and organism identification were captured. Next, a Glow-germ experiment was completed to visually evaluate the cleanliness of provider's hands. Commonly missed areas included fingernails, around rings, and wrists. Finally, a poster was created for the hospitalÆs nurses' week activities. The poster contained facts, pictures of correct and incorrect infection control practices, pictures and results of the hand culture experiment, and information on organization infection control policies. The poster was also displayed on the Heme/Onc unit and with a poster post-test. Hand hygiene observation audits completed by the hospitalÆs infection control practitioners revealed an increase in compliance, with rates starting at 35% and ending at 95%. Concurrently noted was a decreasing incidence of CVC infections, and an overall descending trend since January 2004. Although the project overlapped with organizational education, the rate of compliance on this unit significantly out-paced other clinical areas. Before a culture change can occur, creativity and innovation are crucial for reaching success.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleINCREASING HAND HYGIENE COMPLIANCE REQUIRES CULTURE CHANGEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTreon, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorKelley, Kristenen_US
dc.contributor.authorPatricia Kneebone, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsMichelle Treon, MSN RN OCN, Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist, Clarian Health Partners, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: mtreon@clarian.org; Kristen Kelley, MPH; Patricia Kneebone, BSN, RN, OCN, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana; Regina Miles, BSN, RN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164891-
dc.description.abstractAn estimated 90,000 deaths occur yearly from hospital-acquired infections. Transmission of pathogens often occurs via contaminated hands. Hand hygiene is a simple and effective intervention to reduce the spread of infection. Despite this common knowledge, providers disregard this intervention. Compliance by providers with recommended hand hygiene procedures has remained unacceptable. One type of hospital-acquired infection is a central venous catheter (CVC) infection. Reduction by 90% would save 225,000 patients from experiencing this complication, and $5.63 billion dollars saved nationally. To design an innovative educational intervention to increase awareness of infection control practices, and increase hand hygiene compliance. Interventions targeted multidisciplinary providers on the adult Hematology/Oncology unit. The project was lead by the Clinical Nurse Specialist, Infection Control Practitioner, and Outcome Specialist with participation from the unit staff and Unit Manager. A Likert survey was created for staff to determine degree of compliance aligning with knowledge of infection control. Survey questions were written to elicit honest answers and evoke a self-assessment. Second, an interactive hand culturing experiment occurred. Anonymous volunteers performed hand hygiene, touched common unit surfaces, and placed their hands on blood agar plates. Photographs of the cultures and organism identification were captured. Next, a Glow-germ experiment was completed to visually evaluate the cleanliness of provider's hands. Commonly missed areas included fingernails, around rings, and wrists. Finally, a poster was created for the hospitalÆs nurses' week activities. The poster contained facts, pictures of correct and incorrect infection control practices, pictures and results of the hand culture experiment, and information on organization infection control policies. The poster was also displayed on the Heme/Onc unit and with a poster post-test. Hand hygiene observation audits completed by the hospitalÆs infection control practitioners revealed an increase in compliance, with rates starting at 35% and ending at 95%. Concurrently noted was a decreasing incidence of CVC infections, and an overall descending trend since January 2004. Although the project overlapped with organizational education, the rate of compliance on this unit significantly out-paced other clinical areas. Before a culture change can occur, creativity and innovation are crucial for reaching success.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:49Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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