2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164892
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DEVELOPMENT OF A HOSPITAL-BASED CLINICAL RESEARCH DATABASE
Author(s):
Tucci, Rosemarie
Author Details:
Rosemarie Tucci, RN, MSN, AOCN, Manager, Oncology Research & Data Services, Lankenau Hospital, Wynnewood, Pennsylvania, USA, email: TucciRo@mlhs.org
Abstract:
Investigator-initiated oncology research in a community hospital requires data collection best completed with nursing oversight. Oncology nurses interface with basic scientists, physicians and computer programmers to identify datapoints to be collected, their importance to disease initiation and clinical outcome, to work in building the program and then test it. As community hospitals become hybrids of private practice and hospital- based physicians, data collection for research is difficult. Nursing is the commonality of all settings and centralizes data collection between practices and the hospital itself. Whether finding an existing program that will answer needs or building one, a multi-disciplinary team is needed to get the right one and nursing is a key member. The nursing representative was identified by the multi-disciplinary team as the immediate contact and ôgo-toö person for questions and testing of models. All information to be collected was discussed between clinicians, basic scientists and the nurse and then formatted into spreadsheets for use by the computer programmers. As the system became functional, the nurse populated the system with practice patients to test the system for: ease of data input, availability of data in routine MD charting and querying the data for missing datapoints and expected research questions. Oncology clinical research requires specialized knowledge to understand the unique patient populations and the many endpoints that can be used to evaluate cancer treatments. The Clinical Cancer Analytic Research Database (CCARD) was developed to collect data on 6 disease sites, with a focus on the data being information needed to answer potential questions for combined investigator-initiated basic science and clinical research. Additional sites will be added as time and needs arise. As community hospitals grow, many begin to adopt an academic model, which includes investigator-initiated research. Building research programming that responds to the needs of basic scientists and clinical physicians needs a point person who has knowledge that bridges the knowledge realms of computer programmers and cancer specialists. The oncology nurse fits that role best, as someone who can speak to clinical issues in lay-person terms.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDEVELOPMENT OF A HOSPITAL-BASED CLINICAL RESEARCH DATABASEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTucci, Rosemarieen_US
dc.author.detailsRosemarie Tucci, RN, MSN, AOCN, Manager, Oncology Research & Data Services, Lankenau Hospital, Wynnewood, Pennsylvania, USA, email: TucciRo@mlhs.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164892-
dc.description.abstractInvestigator-initiated oncology research in a community hospital requires data collection best completed with nursing oversight. Oncology nurses interface with basic scientists, physicians and computer programmers to identify datapoints to be collected, their importance to disease initiation and clinical outcome, to work in building the program and then test it. As community hospitals become hybrids of private practice and hospital- based physicians, data collection for research is difficult. Nursing is the commonality of all settings and centralizes data collection between practices and the hospital itself. Whether finding an existing program that will answer needs or building one, a multi-disciplinary team is needed to get the right one and nursing is a key member. The nursing representative was identified by the multi-disciplinary team as the immediate contact and ôgo-toö person for questions and testing of models. All information to be collected was discussed between clinicians, basic scientists and the nurse and then formatted into spreadsheets for use by the computer programmers. As the system became functional, the nurse populated the system with practice patients to test the system for: ease of data input, availability of data in routine MD charting and querying the data for missing datapoints and expected research questions. Oncology clinical research requires specialized knowledge to understand the unique patient populations and the many endpoints that can be used to evaluate cancer treatments. The Clinical Cancer Analytic Research Database (CCARD) was developed to collect data on 6 disease sites, with a focus on the data being information needed to answer potential questions for combined investigator-initiated basic science and clinical research. Additional sites will be added as time and needs arise. As community hospitals grow, many begin to adopt an academic model, which includes investigator-initiated research. Building research programming that responds to the needs of basic scientists and clinical physicians needs a point person who has knowledge that bridges the knowledge realms of computer programmers and cancer specialists. The oncology nurse fits that role best, as someone who can speak to clinical issues in lay-person terms.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:50Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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