CHEMOTHERAPY INDUCED NEUTROPENIA AND RELATIVE DOSE INTENSITY: AN EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE PROJECT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164895
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CHEMOTHERAPY INDUCED NEUTROPENIA AND RELATIVE DOSE INTENSITY: AN EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE PROJECT
Author(s):
Vannice, Sandra; Garcia, Jeremy; Sweeney, Mary; Dingley, Catherine; Derieg, Mary; Trabert, Teresa
Author Details:
Sandra Vannice, RN MSN OCN AOCN, Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado, USA, email: sbvannice@comcast.net; Jeremy Garcia, RN; Mary Sweeney, RN; Catherine Dingley, RN, FNP; Mary Derieg, RN, DNP; Teresa Trabert, RN
Abstract:
Chemotherapy induced neutropenia (CIN) can result in treatment delays and/or dose reductions. Recent studies focused on Relative Dose Intensity (RDI) in patients with non-Hodgkins lymphoma and breast cancer demonstrate that maintaining dose intensity and preventing dose delays impact patient outcomes and survival. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recently published guidelines for the use of myeloid growth factors in cancer treatment, including risk factors for chemotherapy induced neutropenia to guide practitioners in early identification of patients who may benefit from prophylactic growth factor to maintain an optimal treatment schedule. Nursing staff in our infusion center perceived an increase in the number of treatment delays due to neutropenia and felt that our practice patterns appeared inconsistent with current recommendations. Determine the number of chemotherapy patients in our practice who are dose delayed or dose reduced due to CIN and calculate the RDI of this patient population. Determine what risk factors as documented in the literature impact our patient population. Data was collected on chemotherapy treatment delays due to an Absolute Neutrophil Count (ANC) less than 1500 mcg/dl in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Individual risk factors for neutropenia were identified using the Chemotherapy Risk Factor tool created by Wolf, Crawford, & Dale. Thirty patients were identified û 16 outpatients and 14 inpatients. The average RDI of outpatients was 71% and 79% for inpatients with approximately half of the patients with RDIs below the recommended 80%. Predominant risk factors among the patient sample included: advanced cancer, low hemoglobin, bone marrow involvement, and comorbidities such as diabetes. This project informed us as to the number of patients in our practice who experienced CIN resulting in dose delays or dose reductions and congruence of risk factors that impact our patient population with those in the oncology literature. The project focused on a population that is typically underserved, thus contributing to our understanding of the identified risk factors in a diverse population. Future directions include initiatives to implement a risk assessment tool and RDI calculation in our practice setting.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCHEMOTHERAPY INDUCED NEUTROPENIA AND RELATIVE DOSE INTENSITY: AN EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE PROJECTen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVannice, Sandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Jeremyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSweeney, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorDingley, Catherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorDerieg, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorTrabert, Teresaen_US
dc.author.detailsSandra Vannice, RN MSN OCN AOCN, Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado, USA, email: sbvannice@comcast.net; Jeremy Garcia, RN; Mary Sweeney, RN; Catherine Dingley, RN, FNP; Mary Derieg, RN, DNP; Teresa Trabert, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164895-
dc.description.abstractChemotherapy induced neutropenia (CIN) can result in treatment delays and/or dose reductions. Recent studies focused on Relative Dose Intensity (RDI) in patients with non-Hodgkins lymphoma and breast cancer demonstrate that maintaining dose intensity and preventing dose delays impact patient outcomes and survival. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recently published guidelines for the use of myeloid growth factors in cancer treatment, including risk factors for chemotherapy induced neutropenia to guide practitioners in early identification of patients who may benefit from prophylactic growth factor to maintain an optimal treatment schedule. Nursing staff in our infusion center perceived an increase in the number of treatment delays due to neutropenia and felt that our practice patterns appeared inconsistent with current recommendations. Determine the number of chemotherapy patients in our practice who are dose delayed or dose reduced due to CIN and calculate the RDI of this patient population. Determine what risk factors as documented in the literature impact our patient population. Data was collected on chemotherapy treatment delays due to an Absolute Neutrophil Count (ANC) less than 1500 mcg/dl in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Individual risk factors for neutropenia were identified using the Chemotherapy Risk Factor tool created by Wolf, Crawford, & Dale. Thirty patients were identified û 16 outpatients and 14 inpatients. The average RDI of outpatients was 71% and 79% for inpatients with approximately half of the patients with RDIs below the recommended 80%. Predominant risk factors among the patient sample included: advanced cancer, low hemoglobin, bone marrow involvement, and comorbidities such as diabetes. This project informed us as to the number of patients in our practice who experienced CIN resulting in dose delays or dose reductions and congruence of risk factors that impact our patient population with those in the oncology literature. The project focused on a population that is typically underserved, thus contributing to our understanding of the identified risk factors in a diverse population. Future directions include initiatives to implement a risk assessment tool and RDI calculation in our practice setting.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:53Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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