"DID SOMEONE TELL YOU ABOUT MEDICATION SIDE EFFECTS TO WATCH FOR WHEN YOU WENT HOME?"

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164898
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
"DID SOMEONE TELL YOU ABOUT MEDICATION SIDE EFFECTS TO WATCH FOR WHEN YOU WENT HOME?"
Author(s):
Varghese, Valsamma; Gordon, Hyacinth
Author Details:
Valsamma Varghese, RN, Clinical Nurse, MDACC, Houston, Texas, USA, email: vvarghese@mdanderson.org; Hyacinth Gordon, RN, MSN, OCN, CRRN
Abstract:
A study by Clarke, et al revealed that up to 50% of hospitalized patients perceived that they had not received information about the side effects of their medications. Teaching patients about their medications is one of the primary education responsibilities of nurses. To make informed decisions about medications, patients need to be educated about potential side effects. Additionally, knowledge about medication side effects allows patients to report to caregivers in a timely manner so decisions can be made about effectiveness. Although patient instructions for home medications are provided prior to discharge, in a recent survey conducted by the NRC + Picker Institute at a large comprehensive cancer center, 50% of patients on a surgical oncology urology and orthopedic unit reported they were not told about medication side effects to watch for when they were discharged. A quality improvement project was implemented to ensure that nurses provided information to patients about side effects of their medications. A goal was established to lower survey scores to 0% on the NRC+Picker survey (lower score reflects best practice). Strategies included participation by the entire team of nurses and partnerships with nurses and patients/family to ensure the patient is provided with and can recall the medication instructions provided. "Ask Your Nurse" posters were designed and placed in patients' rooms as a reminder to seek information about the side effects of medications received. NRC+ Picker and unit follow-up survey scores one month after implementation of strategies revealed that 100% of patients reported that they were told about the side effects medications. An increase in the nursing documentation about patientsÆ reports of side effects was noted. Patients should be educated about the side effects of medications so that they can report to caregivers in a timely manner and appropriate treatment options can be explored. Nurses are in a unique position to communicate medication side effect information to patients. Implementation of a quality improvement project to promote the education of patients about the side effects of their medications can improve patient care outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title"DID SOMEONE TELL YOU ABOUT MEDICATION SIDE EFFECTS TO WATCH FOR WHEN YOU WENT HOME?"en_GB
dc.contributor.authorVarghese, Valsammaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Hyacinthen_US
dc.author.detailsValsamma Varghese, RN, Clinical Nurse, MDACC, Houston, Texas, USA, email: vvarghese@mdanderson.org; Hyacinth Gordon, RN, MSN, OCN, CRRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164898-
dc.description.abstractA study by Clarke, et al revealed that up to 50% of hospitalized patients perceived that they had not received information about the side effects of their medications. Teaching patients about their medications is one of the primary education responsibilities of nurses. To make informed decisions about medications, patients need to be educated about potential side effects. Additionally, knowledge about medication side effects allows patients to report to caregivers in a timely manner so decisions can be made about effectiveness. Although patient instructions for home medications are provided prior to discharge, in a recent survey conducted by the NRC + Picker Institute at a large comprehensive cancer center, 50% of patients on a surgical oncology urology and orthopedic unit reported they were not told about medication side effects to watch for when they were discharged. A quality improvement project was implemented to ensure that nurses provided information to patients about side effects of their medications. A goal was established to lower survey scores to 0% on the NRC+Picker survey (lower score reflects best practice). Strategies included participation by the entire team of nurses and partnerships with nurses and patients/family to ensure the patient is provided with and can recall the medication instructions provided. "Ask Your Nurse" posters were designed and placed in patients' rooms as a reminder to seek information about the side effects of medications received. NRC+ Picker and unit follow-up survey scores one month after implementation of strategies revealed that 100% of patients reported that they were told about the side effects medications. An increase in the nursing documentation about patientsÆ reports of side effects was noted. Patients should be educated about the side effects of medications so that they can report to caregivers in a timely manner and appropriate treatment options can be explored. Nurses are in a unique position to communicate medication side effect information to patients. Implementation of a quality improvement project to promote the education of patients about the side effects of their medications can improve patient care outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:56Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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