2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164900
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PSYCHOLOGICAL SYMPTOMS IN WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER
Author(s):
Vaughan-Adams, Nicole
Author Details:
Nicole Vaughan-Adams, RN MSN OCN, Assistant Nurse Manager, MD Anderson Cancer Cente, Houston, Texas, USA, email: nvaughan@mdanderson.org
Abstract:
Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women and remains the 2nd leading cause of death among women. The diagnosis of breast cancer can lead to significant emotional distress, which may develop into or exacerbate symptoms of depression and other mood disorders. Significant distress can impact an individualÆs decision to seek medical treatment and follow through various treatment modalities. Literature identifies risk factors to the development of anxiety and depression after receiving the diagnosis of breast cancer. The purpose is to examine the relationship of breast cancer, psychological symptoms and age. The grounded theory was used to compare data and to find if a significant relationship existed. The study analyzed data retrieved from the 2003 National Health Interview Survey Adult Dataset. Women who responded, "yes" to "have you ever been told you have cancer?" n=1313, were compared to individuals who mentioned, "breast cancer" as the kind of cancer, n=408. Psychological symptoms were the measurement of feelings experienced over 30 days. These feelings were sadness, restlessness, hopelessness, worthlessness, fatigue, and presence of feelings that interfered with life. Two age groups were defined, 18 - 49 and 50 - 85. Statistical analysis utilized the Mann-Whitney U test to identify the significant differences between individuals with breast cancer and between age groups. Women with breast cancer experienced a significant amount of restlessness, worthlessness, fatigue, sadness, hopelessness, and nervousness (p<.05). A significant difference exists when comparing younger and older women. Younger women experience significant amounts of hopelessness, worthlessness, nervousness, and restlessness (p<.05). Women with breast cancer experience symptoms that serve as risk factors for developing depression and anxiety. The analysis determined a greater difference between breast cancer, restlessness, worthlessness, and fatigue when compared to all cancers. The results are supported by the literature. Younger women tend to experience more nervousness, hopelessness, and worthlessness. This finding is significant, although limited by the number of younger women interviewed in the survey (ages 18 - 49, n=41, ages 50 - 85, n=367). Further research including a larger sample size of women over age 50 is needed to discuss the relationship of age and psychological symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePSYCHOLOGICAL SYMPTOMS IN WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVaughan-Adams, Nicoleen_US
dc.author.detailsNicole Vaughan-Adams, RN MSN OCN, Assistant Nurse Manager, MD Anderson Cancer Cente, Houston, Texas, USA, email: nvaughan@mdanderson.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164900-
dc.description.abstractBreast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women and remains the 2nd leading cause of death among women. The diagnosis of breast cancer can lead to significant emotional distress, which may develop into or exacerbate symptoms of depression and other mood disorders. Significant distress can impact an individual&AElig;s decision to seek medical treatment and follow through various treatment modalities. Literature identifies risk factors to the development of anxiety and depression after receiving the diagnosis of breast cancer. The purpose is to examine the relationship of breast cancer, psychological symptoms and age. The grounded theory was used to compare data and to find if a significant relationship existed. The study analyzed data retrieved from the 2003 National Health Interview Survey Adult Dataset. Women who responded, &quot;yes&quot; to &quot;have you ever been told you have cancer?&quot; n=1313, were compared to individuals who mentioned, &quot;breast cancer&quot; as the kind of cancer, n=408. Psychological symptoms were the measurement of feelings experienced over 30 days. These feelings were sadness, restlessness, hopelessness, worthlessness, fatigue, and presence of feelings that interfered with life. Two age groups were defined, 18 - 49 and 50 - 85. Statistical analysis utilized the Mann-Whitney U test to identify the significant differences between individuals with breast cancer and between age groups. Women with breast cancer experienced a significant amount of restlessness, worthlessness, fatigue, sadness, hopelessness, and nervousness (p&lt;.05). A significant difference exists when comparing younger and older women. Younger women experience significant amounts of hopelessness, worthlessness, nervousness, and restlessness (p&lt;.05). Women with breast cancer experience symptoms that serve as risk factors for developing depression and anxiety. The analysis determined a greater difference between breast cancer, restlessness, worthlessness, and fatigue when compared to all cancers. The results are supported by the literature. Younger women tend to experience more nervousness, hopelessness, and worthlessness. This finding is significant, although limited by the number of younger women interviewed in the survey (ages 18 - 49, n=41, ages 50 - 85, n=367). Further research including a larger sample size of women over age 50 is needed to discuss the relationship of age and psychological symptoms.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:08:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:08:58Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.