PELVIC AND VAGINAL RECONSTRUCTION: THE ROLE OF THE AMBULATORY CARE ONCOLOGY NURSE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164902
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PELVIC AND VAGINAL RECONSTRUCTION: THE ROLE OF THE AMBULATORY CARE ONCOLOGY NURSE
Author(s):
Vaziri-Kermani, Nasrin
Author Details:
Nasrin Vaziri-Kermani, RN CPSN, Ambulatory Nurse, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: vazirin@mskcc.org
Abstract:
Certain advanced cancers of the vagina, ovaries, rectum, and vulva require extensive surgical resection which often leaves the patient with a large surgical defect in the pelvic, perineal, and vaginal region along with emotional scarring. Specialized reconstructive procedures are now available to correct the surgical defect. Patients undergoing these complicated procedures require extensive preoperative and postoperative education and psychosocial support. Oncology nurses play an essential role in helping patients and their families meet these needs and in insuring they have a smooth transition from their hospital stay to their home care setting. Oncology nurses must be well informed about the complex issues related to pelvic resection followed by pelvic and vaginal reconstruction to provide optimal patient care. Experienced nurses play an important role in sharing their knowledge and educating those nurses who have less experience with regard to the numerous physical, psychosocial, and educational needs of these patients. This presentation will describe how nurses can best meet the needs of these patients. Nursing interventions focus on continuous physical and psychosocial assessment and patient and family education. Nurses need to prepare patients for what to expect postoperatively and how to care for themselves at home. Issues surrounding potential changes in body image, physical and sexual activity, and altered sensation at the surgical sites need to be reviewed. Depending on the specific surgical procedure, education in ostomy and urostomy care may be indicated as well as care of the flap. Patients should be aware of potential complications including ileus, flap loss, and infection. Patients are also at high risk for developing emotional problems including depression, anger, or disappointment and may require a referral for counseling. Upon patient discharge, the nurse makes frequent follow-up phone calls and schedules postoperative visits as needed to allow ongoing evaluation of the patients' physical and emotional progress and to make appropriate referrals as indicated. This information will provide oncology nurses with a more thorough understanding of the specific needs of this patient population and the appropriate nursing intervention to adequately meet these needs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePELVIC AND VAGINAL RECONSTRUCTION: THE ROLE OF THE AMBULATORY CARE ONCOLOGY NURSEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVaziri-Kermani, Nasrinen_US
dc.author.detailsNasrin Vaziri-Kermani, RN CPSN, Ambulatory Nurse, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: vazirin@mskcc.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164902-
dc.description.abstractCertain advanced cancers of the vagina, ovaries, rectum, and vulva require extensive surgical resection which often leaves the patient with a large surgical defect in the pelvic, perineal, and vaginal region along with emotional scarring. Specialized reconstructive procedures are now available to correct the surgical defect. Patients undergoing these complicated procedures require extensive preoperative and postoperative education and psychosocial support. Oncology nurses play an essential role in helping patients and their families meet these needs and in insuring they have a smooth transition from their hospital stay to their home care setting. Oncology nurses must be well informed about the complex issues related to pelvic resection followed by pelvic and vaginal reconstruction to provide optimal patient care. Experienced nurses play an important role in sharing their knowledge and educating those nurses who have less experience with regard to the numerous physical, psychosocial, and educational needs of these patients. This presentation will describe how nurses can best meet the needs of these patients. Nursing interventions focus on continuous physical and psychosocial assessment and patient and family education. Nurses need to prepare patients for what to expect postoperatively and how to care for themselves at home. Issues surrounding potential changes in body image, physical and sexual activity, and altered sensation at the surgical sites need to be reviewed. Depending on the specific surgical procedure, education in ostomy and urostomy care may be indicated as well as care of the flap. Patients should be aware of potential complications including ileus, flap loss, and infection. Patients are also at high risk for developing emotional problems including depression, anger, or disappointment and may require a referral for counseling. Upon patient discharge, the nurse makes frequent follow-up phone calls and schedules postoperative visits as needed to allow ongoing evaluation of the patients' physical and emotional progress and to make appropriate referrals as indicated. This information will provide oncology nurses with a more thorough understanding of the specific needs of this patient population and the appropriate nursing intervention to adequately meet these needs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:00Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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