DELAWARE, THE FIRST STATE IN STATEWIDE CANCER CARE COORDINATION (CCC) AND NAVIGATION

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164905
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DELAWARE, THE FIRST STATE IN STATEWIDE CANCER CARE COORDINATION (CCC) AND NAVIGATION
Author(s):
Waddington, Cynthia; Clifton, Terri; Curtin, Eileen; Mann, Latonya; Russell, Kathleen
Author Details:
Cynthia Waddington, RN MSN AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: cwaddington@christianacare.org; Terri Clifton, MS, NCC, Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Seaford, Delaware; Eileen Curtin, RN, BSN, St. Francis Hospital, Wilmington, Delaware; Latonya Mann, RN, OCN, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware; Kathleen Russell, MPH, Delaware Division of Public Health
Abstract:
Cancer is DelawareÆs second leading cause of death. Additionally, DelawareÆs cancer incidence and death rates are higher than the national average. Governor Ruth Ann Minner and the Delaware General Assembly formed the Delaware Advisory Council on Cancer Incidence and Mortality. With a mission to provide the highest quality care for every Delawarean with cancer, the Delaware Cancer Consortium (DCC) was formed. Noting the effectiveness of the Patient Navigator/Care Coordinator role in navigating patients around barriers to quality care, the DCC implemented a statewide CCC Program. Financial support and leadership in program development ensued, providing a network of CCCs to help patients navigate through the barriers to quality care and the complex and multidisciplinary issues that arise with cancer. The program supports one CCC at each hospital. Facility diversity and geographical locations require CCCs to function uniquely and independently to meet patient needs. Team unity and consistency are facilitated through monthly meetings which provide a collaborative forum for sharing resources, knowledge and support; identifying barriers; and developing policy, procedure and practice standards. CCCs acquire additional role support through education on end of life issues, cultural diversity, financial and insurance issues and caregiver support. Prior to this program only one Delaware hospital utilized CCCs. By end of FY06, each hospital had a CCC. In FY06, DelawareÆs CCCs followed 1,280 patients and provided 11,086 total supportive interventions. CCCs provided counseling on nutrition, psychosocial issues and treatment-related matters on 1,558 occasions. CCCs scheduled 1,332 appointments (specialist referrals, diagnostics, and treatment), and assisted in 346 transportation plans for cancer- related appointments. CCCs provided 252 financial support interventions to assist patients in obtaining medications and 344 interventions to assist patients in finding financial support for co-pays. Of particular importance were the CCCsÆ 80 referrals to the Delaware Cancer Treatment Program which provides the uninsured with one year of cancer treatment insurance. This program demonstrates the impact of individual CCCs on assisting patients to obtain quality cancer care statewide. It also serves as a model of state-level legislative commitment and action. Adoption of this model for any patient population requiring complex multidisciplinary coordination is possible.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDELAWARE, THE FIRST STATE IN STATEWIDE CANCER CARE COORDINATION (CCC) AND NAVIGATIONen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWaddington, Cynthiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorClifton, Terrien_US
dc.contributor.authorCurtin, Eileenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMann, Latonyaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Kathleenen_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Waddington, RN MSN AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: cwaddington@christianacare.org; Terri Clifton, MS, NCC, Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Seaford, Delaware; Eileen Curtin, RN, BSN, St. Francis Hospital, Wilmington, Delaware; Latonya Mann, RN, OCN, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware; Kathleen Russell, MPH, Delaware Division of Public Healthen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164905-
dc.description.abstractCancer is DelawareÆs second leading cause of death. Additionally, DelawareÆs cancer incidence and death rates are higher than the national average. Governor Ruth Ann Minner and the Delaware General Assembly formed the Delaware Advisory Council on Cancer Incidence and Mortality. With a mission to provide the highest quality care for every Delawarean with cancer, the Delaware Cancer Consortium (DCC) was formed. Noting the effectiveness of the Patient Navigator/Care Coordinator role in navigating patients around barriers to quality care, the DCC implemented a statewide CCC Program. Financial support and leadership in program development ensued, providing a network of CCCs to help patients navigate through the barriers to quality care and the complex and multidisciplinary issues that arise with cancer. The program supports one CCC at each hospital. Facility diversity and geographical locations require CCCs to function uniquely and independently to meet patient needs. Team unity and consistency are facilitated through monthly meetings which provide a collaborative forum for sharing resources, knowledge and support; identifying barriers; and developing policy, procedure and practice standards. CCCs acquire additional role support through education on end of life issues, cultural diversity, financial and insurance issues and caregiver support. Prior to this program only one Delaware hospital utilized CCCs. By end of FY06, each hospital had a CCC. In FY06, DelawareÆs CCCs followed 1,280 patients and provided 11,086 total supportive interventions. CCCs provided counseling on nutrition, psychosocial issues and treatment-related matters on 1,558 occasions. CCCs scheduled 1,332 appointments (specialist referrals, diagnostics, and treatment), and assisted in 346 transportation plans for cancer- related appointments. CCCs provided 252 financial support interventions to assist patients in obtaining medications and 344 interventions to assist patients in finding financial support for co-pays. Of particular importance were the CCCsÆ 80 referrals to the Delaware Cancer Treatment Program which provides the uninsured with one year of cancer treatment insurance. This program demonstrates the impact of individual CCCs on assisting patients to obtain quality cancer care statewide. It also serves as a model of state-level legislative commitment and action. Adoption of this model for any patient population requiring complex multidisciplinary coordination is possible.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:04Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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