EVALUATING ALTERNATE APPROACHES FOR DELIVERING NON-PHARMACOLOGICAL INTERVENTIONS FOR DYSPNEA IN PATIENTS WITH LUNG CANCER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164914
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EVALUATING ALTERNATE APPROACHES FOR DELIVERING NON-PHARMACOLOGICAL INTERVENTIONS FOR DYSPNEA IN PATIENTS WITH LUNG CANCER
Author(s):
Yates, Patsy; White, Elizabeth; Skerman, Helen
Author Details:
Patsy Yates, PhD RN, Professor, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia, email: p.yates@qut.edu.au; Elizabeth White, MSc, Aged Care Accreditation, Brisbane, Australia; Helen Skerman, MSocSci
Abstract:
Despite the potential benefits of non-pharmacological strategies for managing dyspnea in lung cancer, such interventions have proved difficult to implement in routine clinical practice because they require specialised training and substantial time. This study aimed to undertake preliminary evaluation of alternate approaches to delivering an intervention involving Breathing Retraining and Targeted Psychosocial Support to improve the nurse sensitive patient outcome - dyspnea CornerÆs Integrated model of dyspnea Two pilot studies using experimental designs were undertaken. Trial one involved a quasi-experimental design with 30 patients assigned to intervention or comparison groups. The intervention group received the intervention in face-to-face sessions administered weekly for 4 weeks at hospital or in the home. Trial two involved a randomised controlled design with 57 patients. The intervention was also administered on a weekly basis for four weeks, however the first session only was delivered face-to-face and follow up sessions were delivered by phone, supported by printed information. In both trials, measures of breathlessness, physical and psychological symptoms, and functional status were undertaken at Baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks Analysis of pre-post intervention assessments in trial 1 revealed a statistically significant intervention effect for breathlessness at best ratings only (F[2,44]=5.30, p=.009). No significant differences were found between groups in breathlessness or symptom distress ratings in trial 2, although the intervention group reported non-pharmacological strategies to be significantly more useful over time than the control group (p<.001). These pilot studies were developed to examine the effectiveness of different delivery formats and shorter time frames or doses of non-pharmacological interventions for dyspnea than those reported in previous studies. Findings provide only minimal evidence of improvement resulting from these intervention strategies. Further sufficiently powered studies are required to investigate ways to optimise the delivery of non-pharmacological interventions for lung cancer and reduce the research-practice gap in this field.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEVALUATING ALTERNATE APPROACHES FOR DELIVERING NON-PHARMACOLOGICAL INTERVENTIONS FOR DYSPNEA IN PATIENTS WITH LUNG CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYates, Patsyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorSkerman, Helenen_US
dc.author.detailsPatsy Yates, PhD RN, Professor, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia, email: p.yates@qut.edu.au; Elizabeth White, MSc, Aged Care Accreditation, Brisbane, Australia; Helen Skerman, MSocScien_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164914-
dc.description.abstractDespite the potential benefits of non-pharmacological strategies for managing dyspnea in lung cancer, such interventions have proved difficult to implement in routine clinical practice because they require specialised training and substantial time. This study aimed to undertake preliminary evaluation of alternate approaches to delivering an intervention involving Breathing Retraining and Targeted Psychosocial Support to improve the nurse sensitive patient outcome - dyspnea Corner&AElig;s Integrated model of dyspnea Two pilot studies using experimental designs were undertaken. Trial one involved a quasi-experimental design with 30 patients assigned to intervention or comparison groups. The intervention group received the intervention in face-to-face sessions administered weekly for 4 weeks at hospital or in the home. Trial two involved a randomised controlled design with 57 patients. The intervention was also administered on a weekly basis for four weeks, however the first session only was delivered face-to-face and follow up sessions were delivered by phone, supported by printed information. In both trials, measures of breathlessness, physical and psychological symptoms, and functional status were undertaken at Baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks Analysis of pre-post intervention assessments in trial 1 revealed a statistically significant intervention effect for breathlessness at best ratings only (F[2,44]=5.30, p=.009). No significant differences were found between groups in breathlessness or symptom distress ratings in trial 2, although the intervention group reported non-pharmacological strategies to be significantly more useful over time than the control group (p&lt;.001). These pilot studies were developed to examine the effectiveness of different delivery formats and shorter time frames or doses of non-pharmacological interventions for dyspnea than those reported in previous studies. Findings provide only minimal evidence of improvement resulting from these intervention strategies. Further sufficiently powered studies are required to investigate ways to optimise the delivery of non-pharmacological interventions for lung cancer and reduce the research-practice gap in this field.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:13Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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