UNDERSTANDING MUCOSA-ASSOCIATED LYMPHOID TISSUE (MALT) LYMPHOMA: HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION AND BEYOND

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164915
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
UNDERSTANDING MUCOSA-ASSOCIATED LYMPHOID TISSUE (MALT) LYMPHOMA: HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION AND BEYOND
Author(s):
Zhong, Yazhen
Author Details:
Yazhen Zhong, RN ANP AOCNP, Advanced Practice Nurse, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: yazhenz@yahoo.com
Abstract:
Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a distinct subtype of extranodal marginal zone B-cell non-Hodgkins lymphoma. The uniqueness of MALT lymphoma is that its growth is stimulated by chronic inflammatory process. Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is a well-known risk factor for gastric MALT lymphoma. More than half of the patients achieve lymphoma regression with eradication of Hp and that made this tumor a popular model of antigen-driven lymphomagenesis. Several infectious agents are reported to be related to non-gastric MALT lymphoma, and targeted new treatments have been studied. It is important that nurses are knowledgeable about the disease process and treatments so they can better educate patients and families about the malignancy. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of primary gastric and non-gastric MALT lymphoma. The overview will include epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and staging, standard and novel treatments, and nursing role in management. MALT lymphoma arises at a variety of organs; however, the stomach is the most common involved organ. It accounts for more than 50% of stomach lymphoma and 90% of the patients are Hp positive. The clinical manifestations of gastric MALT lymphoma may be nonspecific with dyspepsia and epigastric pain. The patient with early stage disease usually has better response to H. pylori eradication treatment. The treatment for non-gastric MALT lymphoma is tailored to the disease site, stage, and characteristics. The choices are involved-field radiation for localized disease. Rituximab is as effective as chemotherapy but less toxic for disseminated disease. The patients do relapse regardless the disease stage. Frequent follow-ups are imperative to monitor the disease status. Oncology nurses who view this presentation will gain a basic understanding of etiology and pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma; recognize early clinical presentations; discuss the unique treatments and the rationale of frequent follow-ups. Since treatment for MALT lymphoma is mostly outpatient or at home, oncology nurses are in a vital position in educating patient of this unique malignancy, reinforcing the importance of treatment compliance and long-term follow-ups, and monitoring treatment side effects.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUNDERSTANDING MUCOSA-ASSOCIATED LYMPHOID TISSUE (MALT) LYMPHOMA: HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION AND BEYONDen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZhong, Yazhenen_US
dc.author.detailsYazhen Zhong, RN ANP AOCNP, Advanced Practice Nurse, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: yazhenz@yahoo.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164915-
dc.description.abstractMucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a distinct subtype of extranodal marginal zone B-cell non-Hodgkins lymphoma. The uniqueness of MALT lymphoma is that its growth is stimulated by chronic inflammatory process. Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is a well-known risk factor for gastric MALT lymphoma. More than half of the patients achieve lymphoma regression with eradication of Hp and that made this tumor a popular model of antigen-driven lymphomagenesis. Several infectious agents are reported to be related to non-gastric MALT lymphoma, and targeted new treatments have been studied. It is important that nurses are knowledgeable about the disease process and treatments so they can better educate patients and families about the malignancy. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of primary gastric and non-gastric MALT lymphoma. The overview will include epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and staging, standard and novel treatments, and nursing role in management. MALT lymphoma arises at a variety of organs; however, the stomach is the most common involved organ. It accounts for more than 50% of stomach lymphoma and 90% of the patients are Hp positive. The clinical manifestations of gastric MALT lymphoma may be nonspecific with dyspepsia and epigastric pain. The patient with early stage disease usually has better response to H. pylori eradication treatment. The treatment for non-gastric MALT lymphoma is tailored to the disease site, stage, and characteristics. The choices are involved-field radiation for localized disease. Rituximab is as effective as chemotherapy but less toxic for disseminated disease. The patients do relapse regardless the disease stage. Frequent follow-ups are imperative to monitor the disease status. Oncology nurses who view this presentation will gain a basic understanding of etiology and pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma; recognize early clinical presentations; discuss the unique treatments and the rationale of frequent follow-ups. Since treatment for MALT lymphoma is mostly outpatient or at home, oncology nurses are in a vital position in educating patient of this unique malignancy, reinforcing the importance of treatment compliance and long-term follow-ups, and monitoring treatment side effects.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:14Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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