2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164917
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Average Discharge Time and Length of Stay: Can the Oncology Nurse Help?
Author(s):
Aubrecht, Vlasta; Gordon, Hyacinth
Author Details:
Vlasta Aubrecht, RN, BSN, Discharge Nurse/Clinical Nurse, U. T. M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: vaubrecht@mdanderson.org; Hyacinth Gordon, RN, MSN, OCN, CRRN
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Oncology patients present with multiple stressors with regard to diagnosis, interventions, and continued treatment during their hospital stay and after discharge from the hospital. Oncology nurses are required to transition patients ôearlierö from hospitals to home. As a result, patientsÆ discharge needs have increased requiring a coordinated interdisciplinary discharge process. In order to address the need for a coordinated discharge process, at a cancer center, the discharge nurse role was created. Discharge nurses are charged with the important responsibility of coordinating the discharge process and assisting patients as they transition along the care continuum efficiently and effectively from the hospital to home. A quality improvement evaluation was implemented on our busy 32 bed surgical urology and orthopedic unit to determine if the discharge nurse role would improve average discharge time, length of stay, and patientsÆ satisfaction with going home. Discharging patients in a timely manner involves highly collaborative relationships between members of the interdisciplinary healthcare team. Strategies included identification of physician champions, education of staff, daily rounds with physicians and case managers, awarding certificates of achievement to nurses who discharged patients prior to designated discharge time, and increased patient involvement in discharge planning. Institutional records reveal that our average discharge time and length of stay have improved. NRC Picker patient satisfaction survey scores reveal fluctuations for satisfaction with going home. Various factors require nurses to discharge surgical urology and orthopedic oncology patients quicker from the hospital setting. Effective and efficient discharge involves the entire interdisciplinary team working together to obtain best patient care outcomes. Transitioning patients in a timely manner along the care continuum has invaluable benefits for everyone. Nurses are in a unique position to ensure that transition needs of patients are adequately addressed to facilitate smooth and timely discharges. The results of this quality improvement assessment appears to support the use of a discharge nurse to coordinate patient discharge reduces discharge time and length of stay and improves NRC Picker satisfaction survey scores on this surgical urology and orthopedic oncology unit.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAverage Discharge Time and Length of Stay: Can the Oncology Nurse Help?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAubrecht, Vlastaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Hyacinthen_US
dc.author.detailsVlasta Aubrecht, RN, BSN, Discharge Nurse/Clinical Nurse, U. T. M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: vaubrecht@mdanderson.org; Hyacinth Gordon, RN, MSN, OCN, CRRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164917-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Oncology patients present with multiple stressors with regard to diagnosis, interventions, and continued treatment during their hospital stay and after discharge from the hospital. Oncology nurses are required to transition patients ôearlierö from hospitals to home. As a result, patientsÆ discharge needs have increased requiring a coordinated interdisciplinary discharge process. In order to address the need for a coordinated discharge process, at a cancer center, the discharge nurse role was created. Discharge nurses are charged with the important responsibility of coordinating the discharge process and assisting patients as they transition along the care continuum efficiently and effectively from the hospital to home. A quality improvement evaluation was implemented on our busy 32 bed surgical urology and orthopedic unit to determine if the discharge nurse role would improve average discharge time, length of stay, and patientsÆ satisfaction with going home. Discharging patients in a timely manner involves highly collaborative relationships between members of the interdisciplinary healthcare team. Strategies included identification of physician champions, education of staff, daily rounds with physicians and case managers, awarding certificates of achievement to nurses who discharged patients prior to designated discharge time, and increased patient involvement in discharge planning. Institutional records reveal that our average discharge time and length of stay have improved. NRC Picker patient satisfaction survey scores reveal fluctuations for satisfaction with going home. Various factors require nurses to discharge surgical urology and orthopedic oncology patients quicker from the hospital setting. Effective and efficient discharge involves the entire interdisciplinary team working together to obtain best patient care outcomes. Transitioning patients in a timely manner along the care continuum has invaluable benefits for everyone. Nurses are in a unique position to ensure that transition needs of patients are adequately addressed to facilitate smooth and timely discharges. The results of this quality improvement assessment appears to support the use of a discharge nurse to coordinate patient discharge reduces discharge time and length of stay and improves NRC Picker satisfaction survey scores on this surgical urology and orthopedic oncology unit.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:16Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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