PSYCHOSOCIAL TRAJECTORIES OF MEN UNDERGOING ACTIVE SURVEILLANCE FOR PROSTATE CANCER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164918
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PSYCHOSOCIAL TRAJECTORIES OF MEN UNDERGOING ACTIVE SURVEILLANCE FOR PROSTATE CANCER
Author(s):
Bailey, Donald; Wallace, Meredith; Landerman, Lawrence; Albala, David; Polascik, Thomas; Robertson, Cary
Author Details:
Donald Bailey, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: chip.bailey@duke.edu; Meredith Wallace, PhD, APRN-BC, Yale U., SON, New Haven, Connecticut; Lawrence Landerman, PhD; David Albala, MD; Thomas Polascik, MD; Cary Robertson, MD
Abstract:
Research Study: Active surveillance (AS) has been proposed as a reasonable alternative for older men with localized prostate cancer. However, this option is controversial, and men undergoing AS live with illness uncertainty. Previous studies have overlooked the psychological ramifications of living with untreated prostate cancer and have not considered that these men experience psychological distress often triggered by the knowledge that their cancer may be growing without specific disease symptoms. The purpose was to describe the psychosocial trajectories of men undergoing AS for prostate cancer during a 24 month time period. The study was conducted from a trajectory perspective based on the work of Clipp, Elder, George and Pieper and Mishel's Uncertainty in Illness Theory. Trajectories reflect the course of a chronic condition over time and the strategies used by the individual to manage its course. Mishel defines uncertainty as an inability to structure meaning for illness-related events. Eight men were recruited from a tertiary care medical center in a southeastern state. They were interviewed in their homes at baseline, over the telephone at 6, 12, and 18 months and then in their homes at 24 months. They completed a questionnaire booklet to include, the Profile of Mood States, Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale, Community Form (MUIS-C), and Cantril's Ladder. The 8 men were 62% Caucasian and 35% African American. They had an average age of 75.4 years (SD=4.8 years) with 5 comorbid health problems. Fifty percent of the men had less than a high school education. Most (63%) were married or living with a partner; 12% were divorced, 25% widowed. Baseline illness uncertainty levels, ranged from 59-102, with a mean score of 80.6, indicative of moderate uncertainty. Longitudinal health pattern graphs of individual subject's mean scores will be presented. This study provides preliminary data on the psychosocial trajectories of men during 24 months of AS and suggests optimal time intervals for nursing intervention. As evidence continues to mount regarding the over-treatment of prostate cancer, it is hoped that more men with localized prostate cancer will consider an AS protocol.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePSYCHOSOCIAL TRAJECTORIES OF MEN UNDERGOING ACTIVE SURVEILLANCE FOR PROSTATE CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Donalden_US
dc.contributor.authorWallace, Meredithen_US
dc.contributor.authorLanderman, Lawrenceen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlbala, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorPolascik, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Caryen_US
dc.author.detailsDonald Bailey, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: chip.bailey@duke.edu; Meredith Wallace, PhD, APRN-BC, Yale U., SON, New Haven, Connecticut; Lawrence Landerman, PhD; David Albala, MD; Thomas Polascik, MD; Cary Robertson, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164918-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Active surveillance (AS) has been proposed as a reasonable alternative for older men with localized prostate cancer. However, this option is controversial, and men undergoing AS live with illness uncertainty. Previous studies have overlooked the psychological ramifications of living with untreated prostate cancer and have not considered that these men experience psychological distress often triggered by the knowledge that their cancer may be growing without specific disease symptoms. The purpose was to describe the psychosocial trajectories of men undergoing AS for prostate cancer during a 24 month time period. The study was conducted from a trajectory perspective based on the work of Clipp, Elder, George and Pieper and Mishel's Uncertainty in Illness Theory. Trajectories reflect the course of a chronic condition over time and the strategies used by the individual to manage its course. Mishel defines uncertainty as an inability to structure meaning for illness-related events. Eight men were recruited from a tertiary care medical center in a southeastern state. They were interviewed in their homes at baseline, over the telephone at 6, 12, and 18 months and then in their homes at 24 months. They completed a questionnaire booklet to include, the Profile of Mood States, Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale, Community Form (MUIS-C), and Cantril's Ladder. The 8 men were 62% Caucasian and 35% African American. They had an average age of 75.4 years (SD=4.8 years) with 5 comorbid health problems. Fifty percent of the men had less than a high school education. Most (63%) were married or living with a partner; 12% were divorced, 25% widowed. Baseline illness uncertainty levels, ranged from 59-102, with a mean score of 80.6, indicative of moderate uncertainty. Longitudinal health pattern graphs of individual subject's mean scores will be presented. This study provides preliminary data on the psychosocial trajectories of men during 24 months of AS and suggests optimal time intervals for nursing intervention. As evidence continues to mount regarding the over-treatment of prostate cancer, it is hoped that more men with localized prostate cancer will consider an AS protocol.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:17Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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