The menopausal experience of premenopausal women receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164920
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The menopausal experience of premenopausal women receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer
Author(s):
Barton, Debra; Tan, Angelina; Atherton, Pamela; Collins, Mary; Sloan, Jeff
Author Details:
Debra Barton, PhD, RN, AOCN, FAAN, Associate Professor, Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, email: Barton.debra@mayo.edu; Angelina Tan; Pamela Atherton, MS; Mary Collins, RN, MSN, Carle Clinic Cancer Center, Urbana, Illinois; Jeff Sloan, PhD
Abstract:
Research Study: Chemotherapy can induce premature ovarian failure and result in early menopause with unwanted symptoms such as hot flashes and decreased sexual interest. Premenopausal women initiating treatment want to know what symptoms they can expect during their treatment experience and when. Most of the studies done thus far have been cross sectional and retrospective. This descriptive substudy was developed as part of an osteoporosis prevention clinical trial to gather prospective, longitudinal data about menopausal symptoms women experience during and after chemotherapy. Specifically, this study evaluated the relationship of climacteric symptoms to menstrual history, age, and time from start of treatment in premenopausal women beginning adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. The theoretical framework is the UCSF School of Nursing Symptom Management model. This model asserts the gold standard for symptom assessment is self report and the symptom experience includes perception, evaluation and response. The design and measure used in this study incorporates this perspective. 152 premenopausal women completed the Greene Climacteric Scale (GCS) at baseline, monthly during chemotherapy, at six months, one and two years after study entry. Descriptive statistics including mean scores on total and subscale scores of the GCS were calculated. Kruskal Wallis analysis of differences and regression analyses were performed. Most women +45 ceased menstruating 6 months after starting treatment. Many symptoms peaked within months 3-6 of chemotherapy initiation but returned to baseline or better by the first follow up after chemotherapy completion. The following symptoms became more bothersome during chemotherapy, and continued so through 2 years of follow-up: sleep, numbness/tingling, muscle/joint pain, hot flashes/sweats and decreased sexual interest. Tamoxifen use predicted lower sexual interest (p=.01) at one year. Cessation of menses predicted worse hot flashes at each time period (6 months, p<.01; 1 and 2 years, <.001 and .02, respectively). These data provide information to allow more comprehensive education by nursing to help prepare women for their treatment experience. Assessment of the symptoms listed above should be made frequently and addressed assertively to decrease negative impact on patientsÆ quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe menopausal experience of premenopausal women receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for breast canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarton, Debraen_US
dc.contributor.authorTan, Angelinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAtherton, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorSloan, Jeffen_US
dc.author.detailsDebra Barton, PhD, RN, AOCN, FAAN, Associate Professor, Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, email: Barton.debra@mayo.edu; Angelina Tan; Pamela Atherton, MS; Mary Collins, RN, MSN, Carle Clinic Cancer Center, Urbana, Illinois; Jeff Sloan, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164920-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Chemotherapy can induce premature ovarian failure and result in early menopause with unwanted symptoms such as hot flashes and decreased sexual interest. Premenopausal women initiating treatment want to know what symptoms they can expect during their treatment experience and when. Most of the studies done thus far have been cross sectional and retrospective. This descriptive substudy was developed as part of an osteoporosis prevention clinical trial to gather prospective, longitudinal data about menopausal symptoms women experience during and after chemotherapy. Specifically, this study evaluated the relationship of climacteric symptoms to menstrual history, age, and time from start of treatment in premenopausal women beginning adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. The theoretical framework is the UCSF School of Nursing Symptom Management model. This model asserts the gold standard for symptom assessment is self report and the symptom experience includes perception, evaluation and response. The design and measure used in this study incorporates this perspective. 152 premenopausal women completed the Greene Climacteric Scale (GCS) at baseline, monthly during chemotherapy, at six months, one and two years after study entry. Descriptive statistics including mean scores on total and subscale scores of the GCS were calculated. Kruskal Wallis analysis of differences and regression analyses were performed. Most women +45 ceased menstruating 6 months after starting treatment. Many symptoms peaked within months 3-6 of chemotherapy initiation but returned to baseline or better by the first follow up after chemotherapy completion. The following symptoms became more bothersome during chemotherapy, and continued so through 2 years of follow-up: sleep, numbness/tingling, muscle/joint pain, hot flashes/sweats and decreased sexual interest. Tamoxifen use predicted lower sexual interest (p=.01) at one year. Cessation of menses predicted worse hot flashes at each time period (6 months, p&lt;.01; 1 and 2 years, &lt;.001 and .02, respectively). These data provide information to allow more comprehensive education by nursing to help prepare women for their treatment experience. Assessment of the symptoms listed above should be made frequently and addressed assertively to decrease negative impact on patients&AElig; quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:20Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.