2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164923
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decreasing Central Line Bloodstream Infections in Hematology Patients
Author(s):
Beschorner, Janice; Cienkus, Susan; Lamour, Ruth; Macklin, Latonya; Miller, Sheila; Tuazon, Sandy
Author Details:
Janice Beschorner, RN, MS, CNS-BC, AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: jbeschorner@earthlink.net; Susan Cienkus, RN, BSN, CIC; Ruth Lamour, RN, BSN; Latonya Macklin, RN, BSN; Sheila Miller, RN, BSN, OCN; Sandy Tuazon, RN, BSN, OCN
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Central line bloodstream infections pose a significant risk to the hospitalized immunocompromised patient. The risk to the patient includes systemic infection which can potentially lead to death. When central line blood cultures are positive, these lines are typically removed which usually results in the placement of a peripheral IV. The number of central line bloodstream infections in our hematology patients was sporadic in 2006. There were 3 infections identified in July 2007 and concerns about these infections were heightened. In response to these infections, the Oncology Care Center made the decision to implement a quality initiative. Data is collected daily on all hematology/oncology patients with central venous catheters and differentiates between permanent versus temporary. The Infection Control Practitioners review the records of the patients with positive blood cultures according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for laboratory-confirmed central line-associated bloodstream infection. All central line bloodstream infections are classified as hospital-acquired or present on admission. Several meetings were held with nursing, Infection Control, Interventional Radiology, the Quality Department, and the Wound group, by observations, and by staff nurse comments. Education was provided in early and mid 2008 to all hematology/ oncology nurses with a focus on the hematology unit and included inservices, memos, and clinical tips. At the end of May 2008 we implemented a pilot using Chlorascrub swabs prior to accessing the central venous catheters. The goal for this initiative was to determine baseline incidence of these infections and implement interventions to decrease the incidence of infections. Focused education on the hematology unit resulted in a drop in the infection rate. When the Chlorascrub was used for a month, there were no central line bloodstream infections. The infection rates for the remainder of 2008 remained low. We identified specific areas for improvement which included a lack of standardization of care for these catheters. Changes in nursing practice were implemented. Oncology nurses are aware of impact of these infections and are invested in trying to prevent them.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecreasing Central Line Bloodstream Infections in Hematology Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeschorner, Janiceen_US
dc.contributor.authorCienkus, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorLamour, Ruthen_US
dc.contributor.authorMacklin, Latonyaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Sheilaen_US
dc.contributor.authorTuazon, Sandyen_US
dc.author.detailsJanice Beschorner, RN, MS, CNS-BC, AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: jbeschorner@earthlink.net; Susan Cienkus, RN, BSN, CIC; Ruth Lamour, RN, BSN; Latonya Macklin, RN, BSN; Sheila Miller, RN, BSN, OCN; Sandy Tuazon, RN, BSN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164923-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Central line bloodstream infections pose a significant risk to the hospitalized immunocompromised patient. The risk to the patient includes systemic infection which can potentially lead to death. When central line blood cultures are positive, these lines are typically removed which usually results in the placement of a peripheral IV. The number of central line bloodstream infections in our hematology patients was sporadic in 2006. There were 3 infections identified in July 2007 and concerns about these infections were heightened. In response to these infections, the Oncology Care Center made the decision to implement a quality initiative. Data is collected daily on all hematology/oncology patients with central venous catheters and differentiates between permanent versus temporary. The Infection Control Practitioners review the records of the patients with positive blood cultures according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for laboratory-confirmed central line-associated bloodstream infection. All central line bloodstream infections are classified as hospital-acquired or present on admission. Several meetings were held with nursing, Infection Control, Interventional Radiology, the Quality Department, and the Wound group, by observations, and by staff nurse comments. Education was provided in early and mid 2008 to all hematology/ oncology nurses with a focus on the hematology unit and included inservices, memos, and clinical tips. At the end of May 2008 we implemented a pilot using Chlorascrub swabs prior to accessing the central venous catheters. The goal for this initiative was to determine baseline incidence of these infections and implement interventions to decrease the incidence of infections. Focused education on the hematology unit resulted in a drop in the infection rate. When the Chlorascrub was used for a month, there were no central line bloodstream infections. The infection rates for the remainder of 2008 remained low. We identified specific areas for improvement which included a lack of standardization of care for these catheters. Changes in nursing practice were implemented. Oncology nurses are aware of impact of these infections and are invested in trying to prevent them.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:23Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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