Appraising the Evidence Related to Avoidance of the Use of Lotions or Topical Agents Prior to Radiation Therapy

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164924
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Appraising the Evidence Related to Avoidance of the Use of Lotions or Topical Agents Prior to Radiation Therapy
Author(s):
Bieck, Patricia; Phillips, Shannon
Author Details:
Patricia Bieck, RN, BSN, OCN, Senior Level 3 Staff Nurse Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA, email: trishbieck@urmc.rochester.edu; Shannon Phillips, MS, RN, AOCNS
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: The goals of radiation oncology nursing care include maintaining skin integrity, promoting comfort and preventing infection. Current practice involves instructing patients to avoid applying lotions or topical agents to the skin within the radiation treatment field for four hours prior to treatment. This practice is based on a belief that the topical agents increase the risk and severity of skin reactions, including erythema and dry desquamation, through a ôbolusö effect of radiation resulting from increased skin thickness. These severe skin reactions often lead to skin breakdown, infection, pain, and treatment delays. The purpose of this project was to determine whether the rationale for avoiding the use of lotions or topical agents for four hours prior to radiation therapy is supported by research evidence. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to determine the current standards of care and to identify research findings to support or refute the practice. Interviews with clinical experts, benchmarking with international cancer centers, and consultation with professional nursing organizations also was done. Although limited, available research refutes the current practice of avoiding the use of lotions or topical agents prior to radiation therapy. Results of benchmarking revealed wide variations in practice, but clinical experts stated that patients may use lotions or topical agents prior to radiation therapy without risk of a "bolus" effect. The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) has no published guidelines specific to this issue, and the ONS Radiation Therapy Special Interest Group acknowledges that clinical practice varies across institutions and additional research is needed. The public health educator at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) was unable to provide specific evidence-based references for their patient education material, but stated that the materials are based on existing NCI sources, nursing text books, and input from clinical experts. The limited evidence in the literature and the absence of confirmation of evidence to support NCI standards suggests that further research is warranted. As a direct result of the questions raised during this project, our facility has developed standardized skin care guidelines and has revised patient education materials.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAppraising the Evidence Related to Avoidance of the Use of Lotions or Topical Agents Prior to Radiation Therapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBieck, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Shannonen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Bieck, RN, BSN, OCN, Senior Level 3 Staff Nurse Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA, email: trishbieck@urmc.rochester.edu; Shannon Phillips, MS, RN, AOCNSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164924-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: The goals of radiation oncology nursing care include maintaining skin integrity, promoting comfort and preventing infection. Current practice involves instructing patients to avoid applying lotions or topical agents to the skin within the radiation treatment field for four hours prior to treatment. This practice is based on a belief that the topical agents increase the risk and severity of skin reactions, including erythema and dry desquamation, through a ôbolusö effect of radiation resulting from increased skin thickness. These severe skin reactions often lead to skin breakdown, infection, pain, and treatment delays. The purpose of this project was to determine whether the rationale for avoiding the use of lotions or topical agents for four hours prior to radiation therapy is supported by research evidence. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to determine the current standards of care and to identify research findings to support or refute the practice. Interviews with clinical experts, benchmarking with international cancer centers, and consultation with professional nursing organizations also was done. Although limited, available research refutes the current practice of avoiding the use of lotions or topical agents prior to radiation therapy. Results of benchmarking revealed wide variations in practice, but clinical experts stated that patients may use lotions or topical agents prior to radiation therapy without risk of a "bolus" effect. The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) has no published guidelines specific to this issue, and the ONS Radiation Therapy Special Interest Group acknowledges that clinical practice varies across institutions and additional research is needed. The public health educator at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) was unable to provide specific evidence-based references for their patient education material, but stated that the materials are based on existing NCI sources, nursing text books, and input from clinical experts. The limited evidence in the literature and the absence of confirmation of evidence to support NCI standards suggests that further research is warranted. As a direct result of the questions raised during this project, our facility has developed standardized skin care guidelines and has revised patient education materials.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:24Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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