Transcultural Palliative Care: Understanding the Diverse Needs of Different Cultures and Faith Practices

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164931
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transcultural Palliative Care: Understanding the Diverse Needs of Different Cultures and Faith Practices
Author(s):
Brown, Frank; Tyson, Wanda
Author Details:
Frank Brown, RN, MSN, OCN, MS, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: frank.brown@roswellpark.org, Wanda Tyson, RN, BSN
Abstract:
Education: Patients facing end-of-life encounter distressing symptoms such as pain, nausea, fatigue and constipation as well as a wide range of emotional and spiritual distress that many times exacerbates physical symptoms. The provision of palliative care provides the opportunity for patient and families to achieve goals of care based on their beliefs, values, ethnicity and spirituality. Many times, health care professionals don't understand the varying needs of diverse patients seeking Oncology care. An educational project was designed with an Oncology staff nurse completing her BSN from Niagara University. During her clinical preceptorship with a clinical nurse specialist at our NCI designated cancer center, five cultural/religious areas were explored: Hispanic, African American, Judaism, Islam and Amish traditions. A comprehensive literature search was conducted, patient interviews were conducted and religious experts shared faith-culturally significant clinical pearls. The goal was to identify the changing and traditional needs and roles of diverse cultural/religious groups. Focus directed at improved communication, new sensitivity and role modeling with our staff fostered improvements. We conduct ongoing formal and informal educational training to ensure more culturally complete assessments in family meetings, counseling and supportive interventions that were being offered. Core findings include simple principles as the need to be heard, respected and feel dignity from staff members. Specific cultural values, spiritual and ethnic and practices need to be incorporated into care planning while planning palliative care and end of life. We must continually strive to demonstrate improvements in providing care to diverse cultures/faith traditions. Oncology nurses have the opportunity to learn about diverse cultures, religions and faith traditions that supports patients and families during their cancer journey as well as while facing a serious life limiting illness. Palliative care practices embrace all patients that we come in contact with and by having a better understanding of diverse groups; we can build trust in patients seeking Oncology care needs from early detection, diagnosis, as well as treatment through palliative care and end of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTranscultural Palliative Care: Understanding the Diverse Needs of Different Cultures and Faith Practicesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Franken_US
dc.contributor.authorTyson, Wandaen_US
dc.author.detailsFrank Brown, RN, MSN, OCN, MS, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: frank.brown@roswellpark.org, Wanda Tyson, RN, BSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164931-
dc.description.abstractEducation: Patients facing end-of-life encounter distressing symptoms such as pain, nausea, fatigue and constipation as well as a wide range of emotional and spiritual distress that many times exacerbates physical symptoms. The provision of palliative care provides the opportunity for patient and families to achieve goals of care based on their beliefs, values, ethnicity and spirituality. Many times, health care professionals don't understand the varying needs of diverse patients seeking Oncology care. An educational project was designed with an Oncology staff nurse completing her BSN from Niagara University. During her clinical preceptorship with a clinical nurse specialist at our NCI designated cancer center, five cultural/religious areas were explored: Hispanic, African American, Judaism, Islam and Amish traditions. A comprehensive literature search was conducted, patient interviews were conducted and religious experts shared faith-culturally significant clinical pearls. The goal was to identify the changing and traditional needs and roles of diverse cultural/religious groups. Focus directed at improved communication, new sensitivity and role modeling with our staff fostered improvements. We conduct ongoing formal and informal educational training to ensure more culturally complete assessments in family meetings, counseling and supportive interventions that were being offered. Core findings include simple principles as the need to be heard, respected and feel dignity from staff members. Specific cultural values, spiritual and ethnic and practices need to be incorporated into care planning while planning palliative care and end of life. We must continually strive to demonstrate improvements in providing care to diverse cultures/faith traditions. Oncology nurses have the opportunity to learn about diverse cultures, religions and faith traditions that supports patients and families during their cancer journey as well as while facing a serious life limiting illness. Palliative care practices embrace all patients that we come in contact with and by having a better understanding of diverse groups; we can build trust in patients seeking Oncology care needs from early detection, diagnosis, as well as treatment through palliative care and end of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:32Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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