2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164934
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Case Presentation of Fournier's Gangrene in Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Author(s):
Carroll, Suzanne; Brown, Linda; Chilson, Joni
Author Details:
Suzanne Carroll, RN, MS, AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Oncology, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: scarroll@wfubmc.edu; Linda Brown, RN, ADN, OCN; Joni Chilson, RN, BSN, OCN
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: In 2008 there were approximately 13,290 new cases of acute myeloid leukemia and about 8,820 deaths from the disease. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is treated with induction chemotherapy (to attain remission) followed by post remission therapy (to maintain remission). The main side effect of treatment is myelosuppression which requires hematological support and management of infectious complications. A rare but serious infectious complication that can occur is these patients is Fournier's Gangrene. Fournier's Gangrene represents a necrotizing infection of the skin and subcutaneous soft tissue of the external genitalia and perineum. Predisposing risk factors for this infection include diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, malnutrition and immunosuppression. The purpose of this poster presentation is to describe the clinical manifestations of a case of Fournier's Gangrene in an acute leukemic patient. Oncology Nurses need to be aware of this rare and often fatal complication to provide the best treatment and supportive care to patients afflicted with this infection. Presentation of Fournier's Gangrene is usually acute. A combination of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms and fungi causes an infection that spreads quickly and causes necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous tissue and muscle. Organisms spread from the subcutaneous tissue along the superficial and deep fascial planes, facilitated by bacterial enzymes and toxins. The infection causes vascular occlusion, ischemia and tissue necrosis. Septicemia with systemic toxicity ensues. Our patient had a history of prolonged neutropenia and a prior disseminated fungal infection when he developed a painful scrotal and perirectal rash. Within hours the erythematous rash transformed into hemorrhagic bullous lesions. Treatment of Fournier's Gangrene entails intravenous antibiotics and surgical debridement. Our patient was not a surgical candidate and he quickly developed septicemia. Supportive care and comfort measures were implemented and the patient expired within 24 hours of the onset of the first symptoms of this infection. Fournier's Gangrene is a rare but lethal infectious complication that can occur in immunocompromised cancer patients. Oncology nurse need to be familiar with this infection to promptly recognize it and offer immediate treatment or the best supportive and comfort care alternatives when treatment is not possible.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Case Presentation of Fournier's Gangrene in Acute Myeloid Leukemiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Suzanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorChilson, Jonien_US
dc.author.detailsSuzanne Carroll, RN, MS, AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Oncology, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: scarroll@wfubmc.edu; Linda Brown, RN, ADN, OCN; Joni Chilson, RN, BSN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164934-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: In 2008 there were approximately 13,290 new cases of acute myeloid leukemia and about 8,820 deaths from the disease. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is treated with induction chemotherapy (to attain remission) followed by post remission therapy (to maintain remission). The main side effect of treatment is myelosuppression which requires hematological support and management of infectious complications. A rare but serious infectious complication that can occur is these patients is Fournier's Gangrene. Fournier's Gangrene represents a necrotizing infection of the skin and subcutaneous soft tissue of the external genitalia and perineum. Predisposing risk factors for this infection include diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, malnutrition and immunosuppression. The purpose of this poster presentation is to describe the clinical manifestations of a case of Fournier's Gangrene in an acute leukemic patient. Oncology Nurses need to be aware of this rare and often fatal complication to provide the best treatment and supportive care to patients afflicted with this infection. Presentation of Fournier's Gangrene is usually acute. A combination of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms and fungi causes an infection that spreads quickly and causes necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous tissue and muscle. Organisms spread from the subcutaneous tissue along the superficial and deep fascial planes, facilitated by bacterial enzymes and toxins. The infection causes vascular occlusion, ischemia and tissue necrosis. Septicemia with systemic toxicity ensues. Our patient had a history of prolonged neutropenia and a prior disseminated fungal infection when he developed a painful scrotal and perirectal rash. Within hours the erythematous rash transformed into hemorrhagic bullous lesions. Treatment of Fournier's Gangrene entails intravenous antibiotics and surgical debridement. Our patient was not a surgical candidate and he quickly developed septicemia. Supportive care and comfort measures were implemented and the patient expired within 24 hours of the onset of the first symptoms of this infection. Fournier's Gangrene is a rare but lethal infectious complication that can occur in immunocompromised cancer patients. Oncology nurse need to be familiar with this infection to promptly recognize it and offer immediate treatment or the best supportive and comfort care alternatives when treatment is not possible.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:35Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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