2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164939
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing care of IV/Vascular connectors based on connector type
Author(s):
Chernecky, Cynthia; Casella, Lindsey
Author Details:
Cynthia Chernecky, RN, PhD, AOCN, FAAN, Professor, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia, USA, email: cchernecky@mail.mcg.edu; Lindsey Casella, RN, MSN, CCRN, University Hospital, Augusta, Georgia
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Intravenous and vascular access connectors are important in oncology nursing practice as they are used in administering fluids, blood products, medications and chemotherapy. Connectors can also cause patient problems due to blood backup into the connector causing partial or complete occlusions and/or catheter related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), either intra-luminal or extra-luminal. We have developed a basic chart related to 3 major types of connectors (positive, negative, neutral pressures) used in the clinical setting and staff nursing maintenance guidelines based on the literature that proper disconnect care may decrease or avoid occlusions and CRBSIs. The goal was to develop a basic maintenance care guide on disconnection for staff nurses who use connectors in patient care. The setting can be in-patient, out-patient, or community care. The avenue of connector use can be intravenous or vascular access. Oncology nurses utilize connectors multiple times, every day, on each patient and need to base their care related to disconnection on the type of connector used. A pocket guide was developed based on previous research that revealed 78% of staff nurses did not know there were different types of connectors and 30% believed the maintenance was the same for all types. The guides are available for use from the authors and are free to be copied. The nursing staff and intravenous teams of local hospitals found the guides easy to use and effective in implementing bedside care. The guide can be posted on medication carts, in medication rooms, in IV supply areas and in community and home health bags. The type of connector(s) used can be highlighted on the guide so the maintenance care during disconnection is easily identified for specific institutions or nursing units. The maintenance of multiple manufacturer connectors should be based on guidelines that are connector technology specific. Involvement of the end user, staff nurses, is imperative to optimal patient care. This small intervention may be a major step in decreasing infections and occlusions in oncology patients requiring intravenous and vascular access.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing care of IV/Vascular connectors based on connector typeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChernecky, Cynthiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCasella, Lindseyen_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Chernecky, RN, PhD, AOCN, FAAN, Professor, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia, USA, email: cchernecky@mail.mcg.edu; Lindsey Casella, RN, MSN, CCRN, University Hospital, Augusta, Georgiaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164939-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Intravenous and vascular access connectors are important in oncology nursing practice as they are used in administering fluids, blood products, medications and chemotherapy. Connectors can also cause patient problems due to blood backup into the connector causing partial or complete occlusions and/or catheter related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), either intra-luminal or extra-luminal. We have developed a basic chart related to 3 major types of connectors (positive, negative, neutral pressures) used in the clinical setting and staff nursing maintenance guidelines based on the literature that proper disconnect care may decrease or avoid occlusions and CRBSIs. The goal was to develop a basic maintenance care guide on disconnection for staff nurses who use connectors in patient care. The setting can be in-patient, out-patient, or community care. The avenue of connector use can be intravenous or vascular access. Oncology nurses utilize connectors multiple times, every day, on each patient and need to base their care related to disconnection on the type of connector used. A pocket guide was developed based on previous research that revealed 78% of staff nurses did not know there were different types of connectors and 30% believed the maintenance was the same for all types. The guides are available for use from the authors and are free to be copied. The nursing staff and intravenous teams of local hospitals found the guides easy to use and effective in implementing bedside care. The guide can be posted on medication carts, in medication rooms, in IV supply areas and in community and home health bags. The type of connector(s) used can be highlighted on the guide so the maintenance care during disconnection is easily identified for specific institutions or nursing units. The maintenance of multiple manufacturer connectors should be based on guidelines that are connector technology specific. Involvement of the end user, staff nurses, is imperative to optimal patient care. This small intervention may be a major step in decreasing infections and occlusions in oncology patients requiring intravenous and vascular access.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:40Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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