2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164942
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Reactions: A BMT Unit Quality Initiative
Author(s):
Combs, Samantha; Carroll, Suzanne
Author Details:
Samantha Combs, RN, BSN, CEN, Unit Based Educator/ FACT Coordinator, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Winston Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: samcombsinnc@yahoo.com; Suzanne Carroll, RN, MS, AOCN
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are cells administered to patients undergoing blood and marrow transplants. Symptoms of a possible reaction to a stem cell infusion include fever, chills, dyspnea, bronchospasm, oxygen desaturation, urticaria, hives, hyper and hypotension, bradycardia, tachycardia, chest pain, back/ flank pain, nausea, vomiting or any other subjective symptom that the patient may express. As a quality improvement initiative for our BMT unit, we tracked the nursing documentation and type of reactions associated with transplants for one year. The purposes of the audit were to ensure our compliance with documentation of reaction standards as well as to track any trends noted in HPC reactions. Oncology nurses working with BMT patients need to be knowledgeable in recognizing and treating adverse reactions to HPC infusions. The purpose of this poster presentation is to present the results of our quality initiative. Audits were conducted on a quarterly basis for all BMT recipients. The audits verified completeness of documentation, type of product infused, presence of reaction and type of reaction if it occurred. Interventions and appropriate MD/Nurse and Lab signatures were also confirmed. Our overall compliance for completing the form was 99%. Reactions occurred in 0-65% of all transplants for the year. The most common reaction demonstrated was nausea followed by chest pain/tightness. Interventions were required and implemented 54% of the time. RN/MD signature compliance ranged from 12.5-89%. Lab signature compliance was 92-100%. Results of the audit clearly identified documentation deficiencies in RN/MD signatures compliance. As a result of the audits we are reviewing our policy and procedure for the reporting of HPC reactions to ensure all necessary steps are in place. We have implemented education on monitoring for adverse reactions during HPC infusions and are also monitoring the reaction forms more closely at the time of the infusions to ensure more complete documentation. Tracking adverse reactions to HPC components is an important component to BMT nursing care. Identifying trends will enable BMT nurses to identify and prepare patients who may be more prone to reactions to their HPC infusion.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHematopoietic Progenitor Cell Reactions: A BMT Unit Quality Initiativeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCombs, Samanthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Suzanneen_US
dc.author.detailsSamantha Combs, RN, BSN, CEN, Unit Based Educator/ FACT Coordinator, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Winston Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: samcombsinnc@yahoo.com; Suzanne Carroll, RN, MS, AOCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164942-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are cells administered to patients undergoing blood and marrow transplants. Symptoms of a possible reaction to a stem cell infusion include fever, chills, dyspnea, bronchospasm, oxygen desaturation, urticaria, hives, hyper and hypotension, bradycardia, tachycardia, chest pain, back/ flank pain, nausea, vomiting or any other subjective symptom that the patient may express. As a quality improvement initiative for our BMT unit, we tracked the nursing documentation and type of reactions associated with transplants for one year. The purposes of the audit were to ensure our compliance with documentation of reaction standards as well as to track any trends noted in HPC reactions. Oncology nurses working with BMT patients need to be knowledgeable in recognizing and treating adverse reactions to HPC infusions. The purpose of this poster presentation is to present the results of our quality initiative. Audits were conducted on a quarterly basis for all BMT recipients. The audits verified completeness of documentation, type of product infused, presence of reaction and type of reaction if it occurred. Interventions and appropriate MD/Nurse and Lab signatures were also confirmed. Our overall compliance for completing the form was 99%. Reactions occurred in 0-65% of all transplants for the year. The most common reaction demonstrated was nausea followed by chest pain/tightness. Interventions were required and implemented 54% of the time. RN/MD signature compliance ranged from 12.5-89%. Lab signature compliance was 92-100%. Results of the audit clearly identified documentation deficiencies in RN/MD signatures compliance. As a result of the audits we are reviewing our policy and procedure for the reporting of HPC reactions to ensure all necessary steps are in place. We have implemented education on monitoring for adverse reactions during HPC infusions and are also monitoring the reaction forms more closely at the time of the infusions to ensure more complete documentation. Tracking adverse reactions to HPC components is an important component to BMT nursing care. Identifying trends will enable BMT nurses to identify and prepare patients who may be more prone to reactions to their HPC infusion.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:43Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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