Nurses Use Motivational Interviewing to Improve Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164943
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses Use Motivational Interviewing to Improve Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates
Author(s):
Corey, Peggy; Gorski, Julie; Schaper, Ana; Newberry, Shirley
Author Details:
Peggy Corey, RN, BSN, OCN, Gundersen Lutheran Health System, La Crosse, Wisconsin, USA, email: prcorey@gundluth.org; Julie Gorski, BSN, RN; Ana Schaper, PhD, RN; Shirley Newberry, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: In 2008, the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Research Priorities Survey determined cancer screening and early detection as number twelve in their list of 20 evidenced-based priorities. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality and is largely a preventable disease. The removal of pre-cancerous polyps through the use of colonoscopy can reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer by 75-90%, yet colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates, particularly colonoscopy, remain low nationally. Motivational interviewing (MI), incorporating the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of behavior change is a patient centered directive method of communication for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence, anger and fear. Research has demonstrated that MI can increase mammography screening and smoking cessation rates. To document the process and outcomes of a telephone intervention utilizing MI communication strategies on colonoscopy rates. Two nurses trained in MI conducted telephone interviews using MI with patients who had been referred for colonoscopy but failed to schedule within six months. Data were collected on: patient's TTM stage of change, overall health, scheduling issues, MI skills used, and outcomes. Of the 163 patients telephoned, 57% were female, 52% rated their health as very good/excellent, and 53% presented in either pre-contemplation or contemplation stage of change. Reasons for not scheduling: too busy/forgot (27%), not ready (19%), other health problems (19%), preparation and /or pain concerns (16%), and no insurance (9%). Interventions included: education (n=51) and /or MI strategies (n=42). Outcomes included: 114 (69%) patients scheduled colonoscopy, 85 (75%) tests completed, 45 (53%) patients with polyps, 29 (64%) patients with pre-cancerous polyps, and one patient presented with a carcinoid polyp. Patients rating their health as fair or poor were the least likely to schedule. Colonoscopy screening rates improved following a telephone interview using MI in addition to education. Skills in MI allow oncology nurses to individualize care plans and to assist patients to progress from pre contemplation to action. Nurses, who utilize MI skills, can play a vital role in reducing CRC and in promoting CRC screening.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses Use Motivational Interviewing to Improve Colorectal Cancer Screening Ratesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCorey, Peggyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGorski, Julieen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchaper, Anaen_US
dc.contributor.authorNewberry, Shirleyen_US
dc.author.detailsPeggy Corey, RN, BSN, OCN, Gundersen Lutheran Health System, La Crosse, Wisconsin, USA, email: prcorey@gundluth.org; Julie Gorski, BSN, RN; Ana Schaper, PhD, RN; Shirley Newberry, PhD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164943-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: In 2008, the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Research Priorities Survey determined cancer screening and early detection as number twelve in their list of 20 evidenced-based priorities. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality and is largely a preventable disease. The removal of pre-cancerous polyps through the use of colonoscopy can reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer by 75-90%, yet colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates, particularly colonoscopy, remain low nationally. Motivational interviewing (MI), incorporating the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of behavior change is a patient centered directive method of communication for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence, anger and fear. Research has demonstrated that MI can increase mammography screening and smoking cessation rates. To document the process and outcomes of a telephone intervention utilizing MI communication strategies on colonoscopy rates. Two nurses trained in MI conducted telephone interviews using MI with patients who had been referred for colonoscopy but failed to schedule within six months. Data were collected on: patient's TTM stage of change, overall health, scheduling issues, MI skills used, and outcomes. Of the 163 patients telephoned, 57% were female, 52% rated their health as very good/excellent, and 53% presented in either pre-contemplation or contemplation stage of change. Reasons for not scheduling: too busy/forgot (27%), not ready (19%), other health problems (19%), preparation and /or pain concerns (16%), and no insurance (9%). Interventions included: education (n=51) and /or MI strategies (n=42). Outcomes included: 114 (69%) patients scheduled colonoscopy, 85 (75%) tests completed, 45 (53%) patients with polyps, 29 (64%) patients with pre-cancerous polyps, and one patient presented with a carcinoid polyp. Patients rating their health as fair or poor were the least likely to schedule. Colonoscopy screening rates improved following a telephone interview using MI in addition to education. Skills in MI allow oncology nurses to individualize care plans and to assist patients to progress from pre contemplation to action. Nurses, who utilize MI skills, can play a vital role in reducing CRC and in promoting CRC screening.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:44Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.