Delivering on a Promise to Design an Effective Graduate Nurse Transition Program- Outcomes at 8 Years

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164952
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Delivering on a Promise to Design an Effective Graduate Nurse Transition Program- Outcomes at 8 Years
Author(s):
Dell, Deena; Hambleton, Joanne; Mullin, Maureen
Author Details:
Deena Dell, MSN, RN-BC, AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: deena.dell@fccc.edu; Joanne Hambleton, RN, MSN, NE-BC; Maureen Mullin, RN, BSN, OCN, CHCR
Abstract:
Administration/Leadership Development: Based on nursing workforce studies and economic predictions in 2000, Fox Chase Cancer Center began, in the Spring of 2001, hiring new graduate nurses (NGNs) as a source of "nurse power." As previously reported, we accepted the following assumptions: NGNs enter the workforce with minimal clinical oncology experience, employers must develop orientation programs that foster growth and development by breaking down competencies into small tasks and retention is linked to successful orientation experiences. In order to maximize the experience and minimize stress, we budgeted the positions above our staffing complement, allowing us to count orientation time as non-productive hours. The purpose was to validate our return on investment and to encourage others to develop such a program. Results of standardized evaluation tools utilized at baseline and 1 year measuring organizational commitment, professional autonomy and self-confidence in clinical skills have been previously reported and will be reviewed. Statistics will be updated regarding retention, resignation patterns, turnover/vacancy statistics and professional participation within the organization as well as outcomes of subjective evaluation tools. Budgetary considerations including startup cost, budgeted dollars throughout the years and grant support will be evaluated. National studies have identified NGN turnover rates of 30% at 1 year and 57% at 2 years. Our turnover rates are 10% at 1 year and 20% at 2 years. At an estimated cost as high as $145,000 to replace an RN, our low turnover rates have resulted in significant savings. Additionally, we have received grant support of $850,000 over the last 4 years which has further offset expenses. Most excitingly, NGNs are performing at a competent level on our clinical ladder at 12 months. Prior to the implementation of this structured, faculty led curriculum, new graduates required a minimum of two full years to achieve competent level on our clinical ladder. The nursing shortage continues to impact nursing practice globally, yet the economy begs the question, are extensive transition programs cost-effective and how do they affect nurse competence and patient care? Our favorable outcomes will be reviewed to support the investment of money and time in new graduate training and support.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDelivering on a Promise to Design an Effective Graduate Nurse Transition Program- Outcomes at 8 Yearsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDell, Deenaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHambleton, Joanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorMullin, Maureenen_US
dc.author.detailsDeena Dell, MSN, RN-BC, AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: deena.dell@fccc.edu; Joanne Hambleton, RN, MSN, NE-BC; Maureen Mullin, RN, BSN, OCN, CHCRen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164952-
dc.description.abstractAdministration/Leadership Development: Based on nursing workforce studies and economic predictions in 2000, Fox Chase Cancer Center began, in the Spring of 2001, hiring new graduate nurses (NGNs) as a source of "nurse power." As previously reported, we accepted the following assumptions: NGNs enter the workforce with minimal clinical oncology experience, employers must develop orientation programs that foster growth and development by breaking down competencies into small tasks and retention is linked to successful orientation experiences. In order to maximize the experience and minimize stress, we budgeted the positions above our staffing complement, allowing us to count orientation time as non-productive hours. The purpose was to validate our return on investment and to encourage others to develop such a program. Results of standardized evaluation tools utilized at baseline and 1 year measuring organizational commitment, professional autonomy and self-confidence in clinical skills have been previously reported and will be reviewed. Statistics will be updated regarding retention, resignation patterns, turnover/vacancy statistics and professional participation within the organization as well as outcomes of subjective evaluation tools. Budgetary considerations including startup cost, budgeted dollars throughout the years and grant support will be evaluated. National studies have identified NGN turnover rates of 30% at 1 year and 57% at 2 years. Our turnover rates are 10% at 1 year and 20% at 2 years. At an estimated cost as high as $145,000 to replace an RN, our low turnover rates have resulted in significant savings. Additionally, we have received grant support of $850,000 over the last 4 years which has further offset expenses. Most excitingly, NGNs are performing at a competent level on our clinical ladder at 12 months. Prior to the implementation of this structured, faculty led curriculum, new graduates required a minimum of two full years to achieve competent level on our clinical ladder. The nursing shortage continues to impact nursing practice globally, yet the economy begs the question, are extensive transition programs cost-effective and how do they affect nurse competence and patient care? Our favorable outcomes will be reviewed to support the investment of money and time in new graduate training and support.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:09:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:09:54Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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