INNOVATIVE EQUIPMENT DESIGN PROMOTES IMPROVED OUTCOMES IN THE POST-OPERATIVE THORACIC POPULATION

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164958
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
INNOVATIVE EQUIPMENT DESIGN PROMOTES IMPROVED OUTCOMES IN THE POST-OPERATIVE THORACIC POPULATION
Author(s):
Edmondson, Donna; Tunney, Diane; Innamarato, Therese
Author Details:
Donna Edmondson, MSN, CRNP, OCN, Nurse Practitioner, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dedmondson@fccc.edu; Diane Tunney, RN, OCN; Therese Innamarato, RN, OCN
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Evidence-based research supports early ambulation in the post-operative thoracic patient decreases length of hospital stay, a decline in infection rates and home oxygen requirements. Surgical pain, lack of endurance and cumbersome equipment are deterrents to ambulation in this population. The need for ambulatory friendly equipment and a system to communicate to the health care team that walking requirements were being met was evident. The goal is to increase patient motivation to ambulate in a manner which decreases the physical stress to patients and staff imposed by bulky equipment. By providing visual cues, the patients will increase both length and number of walks taken as well as communicate their progress to the inter-disciplinary team. Adoption of the thoracic walker took place in May 2008. It was customized to provide suction and oxygen if required. The design of the tall walker allows for changes in height to meet the needs of the individual patient thus providing proper body mechanics while ambulating. Arm rests and hand grips allow for patient comfort. Feedback is provided to the patient by way of visual cues strategically placed on the unit. Plaques placed on the unit signify the amount of feet walked and elastic bands hung on hooks outside the patients' doorway signify the number of walks taken for the day; so named, "Strides of Success." A study of 50 patients with stage 1A lung cancer who underwent VATS (Video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery) lobectomy from May 2008 through February 2009 is being evaluated. Inclusion factors will be the pre-operative FEV1 (Forced Expiratory Volume) and Charlson Risk Index. This population will be compared to 50 patients that underwent VATS lobectomy January 2007 to January 2008. This study will show that the evolution of a common place walker and using readily available resources for visual cues, have increased patient independence, sense of achievement, and improved patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleINNOVATIVE EQUIPMENT DESIGN PROMOTES IMPROVED OUTCOMES IN THE POST-OPERATIVE THORACIC POPULATIONen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEdmondson, Donnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorTunney, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorInnamarato, Thereseen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Edmondson, MSN, CRNP, OCN, Nurse Practitioner, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dedmondson@fccc.edu; Diane Tunney, RN, OCN; Therese Innamarato, RN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164958-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Evidence-based research supports early ambulation in the post-operative thoracic patient decreases length of hospital stay, a decline in infection rates and home oxygen requirements. Surgical pain, lack of endurance and cumbersome equipment are deterrents to ambulation in this population. The need for ambulatory friendly equipment and a system to communicate to the health care team that walking requirements were being met was evident. The goal is to increase patient motivation to ambulate in a manner which decreases the physical stress to patients and staff imposed by bulky equipment. By providing visual cues, the patients will increase both length and number of walks taken as well as communicate their progress to the inter-disciplinary team. Adoption of the thoracic walker took place in May 2008. It was customized to provide suction and oxygen if required. The design of the tall walker allows for changes in height to meet the needs of the individual patient thus providing proper body mechanics while ambulating. Arm rests and hand grips allow for patient comfort. Feedback is provided to the patient by way of visual cues strategically placed on the unit. Plaques placed on the unit signify the amount of feet walked and elastic bands hung on hooks outside the patients' doorway signify the number of walks taken for the day; so named, "Strides of Success." A study of 50 patients with stage 1A lung cancer who underwent VATS (Video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery) lobectomy from May 2008 through February 2009 is being evaluated. Inclusion factors will be the pre-operative FEV1 (Forced Expiratory Volume) and Charlson Risk Index. This population will be compared to 50 patients that underwent VATS lobectomy January 2007 to January 2008. This study will show that the evolution of a common place walker and using readily available resources for visual cues, have increased patient independence, sense of achievement, and improved patient outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:01Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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